New fund for tree planting

HUNDREDS of new trees and hedges are to be planted at Hollesley and Rendlesham - paid for by companies as part of a long-term contribution to reducing their environmental footprints.

HUNDREDS of new trees and hedges are to be planted at Hollesley and Rendlesham - paid for by companies as part of a long-term contribution to reducing their environmental footprints.

Suffolk Coastal has linked up with Tree Appeal to identify the first two sites in Suffolk to benefit from the fund, which aims to make the world a greener place by planting broad-leaved trees and providing woodland habitats.

“This is an excellent initiative which encourages companies to take a green stand and make an on-going long-term contribution to the environment by making a donation to Tree Appeal who then plant trees both in this country and elsewhere in the world,” said council cabinet member Andrew Nunn.

“I am delighted that we appear to be the first in East Anglia to have linked up with Tree Appeal to get some planting in our district, and I hope that we can attract as many volunteers as possible to help with the projects.”


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Most planting by Tree Appeal will be in places such as hedgerows, woodlands and nature reserves, or alongside roads, rivers or farmland.

“Suffolk Coastal's role is to help attract volunteers and identify where future projects could occur,” said Mr Nunn.

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“We have been running our own parish tree scheme for over 20 years where we have worked with local communities to plant tens of thousands of trees, so we already have a lot of experience and knowledge.

“One of our priorities is to develop and promote green policies and improved environmental management across our district so this is a really exciting initiative.”

Anyone who would like to get involved in the planting at Hollesley and Rendlesham next month or other tree planting events in the district can contact Joanna Payne by emailing joanna.payne@suffolkcoastal.gov.uk or writing to her at Suffolk Coastal District Council, Melton Hill, Woodbridge IP12 1AU.

A considerable percentage of Britain's native broad-leaved trees are in their latter years of maturity which makes them very vulnerable to storm damage and natural decay. Over the last 50 years, 45 per cent of the nation's ancient, semi-natural woodland has been cleared or converted to commercial plantations.

This was further compounded by losses of around 19 million trees destroyed in the storms of 1987 and 1990. It is also estimated more than 30 million trees have also been killed by Dutch Elm Disease.

Do you think we are losing too much woodland? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

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