New mission for Afghan orphans

SOLDIERS today formed a human chain in an amazing mission deep in the Suffolk countryside.They were needed to load 150 bags of essential items for children in war-torn Kabul, which have been remarkably collected by just one woman.

By Nick Richards

SOLDIERS today formed a human chain in an amazing mission deep in the Suffolk countryside.

They were needed to load 150 bags of essential items for children in war-torn Kabul, which have been remarkably collected by just one woman.

The bags of clothes, shoes, paints, toys and colouring books, have been collected by Lori Eaton in little more than one week.


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Mrs Eaton, whose husband, Major Adam Eaton is a company commander in the 1st Battalion the Royal Anglian's, began collecting gifts after reading her husband's letters from Kabul.

Mrs Eaton, who lives in Bramford Tye, said: "After reading my husband's letters from Kabul about the orphanage and the sad conditions for the children there, I had to do something.

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"I've been overwhelmed by the generosity of people. I've had a fantastic response, not only from people in Ipswich but from all around the area. So far I've collected enough to fill two lorries.

"I only started collecting ten days ago and haven't really advertised anywhere – I only put up two posters. This response has mainly come through word-of-mouth and it has been unbelievable."

All the items which have been hand-sorted by Mrs Eaton before they make their way to RAF Brize Norton. They should be out in Kabul in the next four weeks.

"We've had some brilliant donations. Safeways in Windsor donated lots of brand new items and Ipswich Town have donated three footballs. Some of the things were not suitable, such as Action Men, but we will sell those and send the money over" said Mrs Eaton.

"All I want is for my husband to see the children's faces when they receive these gifts. This is all about the children."

Mrs Eaton's collection is part of wider project by 1 Royal Anglian to help improve conditions in the orphanage and provide basic essential such as clean water, sewerage and bedding.

Captain Oli Brown of the 1 Royal Anglian in Kabul said: "We were shocked by the basic conditions the children were living in and lack of home comforts, so we decided to see what we could do to help improve things.

"We've been looking into resources and funding so that we can get the project to renovate and improve the orphanage moving."

The orphanage homes 600 boys and girls who have lost their parents during 23 years of civil war. The children have 200 beds to share between 600 of them.

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