New probe into superbug baby death

A MAJOR new investigation involving national experts is today underway at Ipswich Hospital in a bid to find out exactly how baby Luke Day contracted MRSA.

A MAJOR new investigation involving national experts is today underway at Ipswich Hospital in a bid to find out exactly how baby Luke Day contracted MRSA.

The hospital's own investigations failed to find any answers so they have now called in experts from the Strategic Health Authority and the Health Protection Agency to carry out extensive further inquiries.

The news comes after the Evening Star posed 20 crucial questions to the hospital on how they are dealing with the superbug in the wake of Luke's death.

And the bug is once again under the national spotlight today as health professionals and patient representatives attend a Clean Hospitals Summit in London.


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Chris Dooley, the hospital's acting chief executive, said: "Everyone at the hospital remains devastated and determined to find the cause of what happened.

"The work the SHA began immediately after Luke's death has continued and led to a new, very thorough, review."

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Julie Fenton, Luke's paternal grandmother, said the family welcomed the investigation but added that they were not being kept informed of what was happening in the aftermath of her grandson's death.

She said: "Obviously we welcome this further investigation into Luke's death, but it would be nice if had been told – we only hear these things from the press."

The hospital are unable to respond to the Star's questions until the review has concluded but have promised to provide full answers as soon as this happens.

A review panel has now been set up and its members include national experts from the fields of microbiology, infection control nursing and the Health Protection Agency.

They will have the autonomy to determine exactly what they want to review but it is expected they will be looking closely at every aspect of what happened to Luke, as well as wider infection control issues.

This will include reassessing the samples taken by microbiologists, talking extensively to staff about their involvement and reviewing the hospital's infection control procedures.

Mr Dooley said: "We asked for this review because we want to do everything possible to understand and explain to all our communities and staff exactly what happened."

It is not known how long the investigation will take.

Since Luke's death the hospital has worked hard to reassure the public and produced an information leaflet on MRSA and other infections which has been distributed around the wards.

They are also urging staff and visitors to be extra vigilant when it comes to hand washing and to point out any problems or issues as soon as they arise.

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