New Year comes in at home for most

TONIGHT may be the biggest party of the year, but it seems people in Suffolk may be shunning a drunken night out to see in 2005.Even though partiers traditionally head to pub or clubs on New Year's Eve, new research suggests people are increasingly irritated by such celebrations.

TONIGHT may be the biggest party of the year, but it seems people in Suffolk may be shunning a drunken night out to see in 2005.

Even though partiers traditionally head to pub or clubs on New Year's Eve, new research suggests people are increasingly irritated by such celebrations.

Research from credit card company MINT says a staggering 85 per cent of people in the east of England find New Year's Eve frustrating - with the higher prices in clubs and bars and people having too much to drink being the main complaints.

The study concludes people will spend an average of £98.72 on New Year's Eve in the east of England.

The research also says that 76pc of people in the east of England have no plans for New Year's Eve at all and of those that do, almost 20pc are simply planning to watch television at home.

In contrast, almost half (48pc) of people in the UK say they want to make the most of New Year's Day.

Most Read

The most popular activity, for 46pc of people, is to get some fresh air with a long walk, followed by watching television, having brunch with friends and hunting for a bargain in the January sales.

Fay Hogg, head of communications for MINT, said: "We can see significant apathy about New Year's Eve.

"There seems to be a backlash against going out to bars and clubs and anything that feels like a rip-off. "In contrast, in an increasingly cash-savvy but time-poor nation, the real value we place is on making the most of New Year's Day.

"With it falling on a Saturday this year, giving us an extra day off on the Monday, you would need a seriously good reason not to celebrate in style."

Tom Wright, VisitBritain's chief executive, said: "However you welcome in the New Year, there's a rich range of experiences and activities around Britain to suit every taste. British visitors are increasingly aware of all the opportunities a break in their country offers."

Sean Deverson, 17, of Britannia Road, Ipswich said: "I used to go to Copleston High School, Ipswich, and there is a party in the sports barn there. All my friends are going. I've got no plans to stay in."

Claire Guernari, 31, of Little Oakley, said: "We're having a party at home for family - it's going to be quite a small party. We didn't want to go out anywhere because it's too busy, too expensive and you have to organise getting a taxi which is difficult."

James Carter, 23, of Green Man Way, Woodbridge, said: "I don't what I'll be doing. I'm working on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day - I work for a bookies in Ipswich. I will probably stay at home in Woodbridge and meet up with a couple of mates - it's too cold to go out this year."

Rebecca Rolls, 26, of Creeting St Peter, said: "I haven't got anything planned at the moment. I live in the middle of nowhere and I can't get anywhere and I don't want to drive. So I will probably stay at home and watch telly with my boyfriend who has just come over from Israel."

Charles Tracy, 66, of Ann Street, said: "I'm thinking of going to an Indian restaurant with my wife and a some friends. I am terrified of pubs, especially on New Year's Eve so we'll probably have real ale at home beforehand."

Mark Winter, 42, of School Lane, Ufford, said: "I will be working unfortunately - I work in London as a policeman. I'll be patrolling the streets, quite probably in Trafalgar Square. I would rather be off but someone has got to do it. My family - my wife, my ten-year-old son and six-year-old daughter - will be at home and maybe the children will be allowed to stay up!"

Debbie Nicholl, 40, of Broadmere Road, Ipswich, said: "We'll probably go around to my in-laws for something to eat and a drink. We went last year and I think we'll be doing that this year. We've no plans to go out."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter