No escape for drivers who park illegally

PARKING wardens have been given new powers to catch drivers who try to drive off before they are able to give them a ticket.New rules being handed to Ipswich Borough Council by the government will also see drivers who threaten parking officers fined and the penalties for the worst parking offences rise by £10 to £70.

Grant Sherlock

PARKING wardens have been given new powers to catch drivers who try to drive off before they are able to give them a ticket.

New rules being handed to Ipswich Borough Council by the government will also see drivers who threaten parking officers fined and the penalties for the worst parking offences rise by £10 to £70.

Lesser offences like staying in a public car park too long are set to drop from £60 to £50 under the changes.


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The borough council today said that the government is asking it, along with hundreds of other councils, to bring in a new “civil enforcement” system from March 31.

The council has carried out yellow line parking enforcement for the Highways Authority since powers were taken over from the police in 2005.

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The council has always been responsible for enforcing offences in its own public car parks

A spokesman for the borough said today: “The huge majority of motorists who do not park illegally will not notice the changes but those who do will face a new two-tier penalty system.

“This reflects the fact that some offences, such as parking on double yellow lines or on zig-zag lines next to a pedestrian crossing, are more serious - and potentially dangerous - than others, such as parking for too long in a public car park.

“The penalty for the more serious offences on the street are £70 or £35 if paid within 14 days. The other offences carry a penalty of £50, or £25 if paid within 14 days.”

The changes will also allow the council's parking enforcement officers to issue penalty charge notices to motorists who either speed off before a fine can be fixed to their vehicle to vehicle.

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