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Noah’s Ark is extending its stay on Ipswich Waterfront to 2021

PUBLISHED: 14:09 24 July 2020 | UPDATED: 15:16 24 July 2020

Noah's Ark docked in Ipswich's Waterfront, where it could stay until March 2021. Picture: OTT TUULBERG

Noah's Ark docked in Ipswich's Waterfront, where it could stay until March 2021. Picture: OTT TUULBERG

Archant

Noah’s Ark – the giant floating museum which retells Biblical stories – will continue to welcome visitors at Ipswich Waterfront until next year.

The replica ark, which is docked at Ipswich Waterfront, is around 70m long.  Picture: ADAM HOWLETTThe replica ark, which is docked at Ipswich Waterfront, is around 70m long. Picture: ADAM HOWLETT

The Ark of Noah is owned by a Dutch TV producer and docked at Ipswich in November 2019, with the town becoming the latest in a line of European destinations to house the vessel. It had previously visited Norway, the Netherlands and Germany.

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The museum was due to leave the waterfront in March this year, but now fans will have a little longer to pay it a visit.

So far the 70m-long vessel has seen more than 15,000 visitors, with people travelling down to see it from as far away as the Scottish Highlands.

The museum was due to leave the Waterfront on March 31 this year, but now fans will have a little longer to pay the popular tourist attraction a visit.

Representatives of the Ark of Noah, said: “We are glad to announce that the Ark of Noah will stay in Ipswich harbour for longer term till max March 2021.

“We are open daily from 10am to 6pm and we hope to see you on board.”

The ark can be found at Orwell Quay, near Cult Cafe.

It is 70m long, 9.5m wide and 13m high and is the creation of Dutch artist and TV producer Sir Aad Peters and tells the story of the bible through his artistic vision, with the help of quirky and creative sculptures.

It has welcomed more than 500,000 visitors on board since it was created in 2010 – where it was built on an inland vessel that used to transport iron ore. The Ark itself has no engine and is therefore towed between destinations.

Sir Peters said it is not a Christian centre, but instead hopes the ark can be a centre of learning, where people from a range of cultures and beliefs can come together and share their stories.

The ark will be following the national coronavirus guidelines and is in continuous consultation with the local government to assess the situation on a daily basis.

The team has prepared a one-way route through the exhibition and will continually adopt and review new government guidance as and when it is available.

Adult tickets are priced at £16.50, with children under 14 charged £9.50.

Discounted tickets are also available for students, seniors and disabled people for £12.50.

For more details and to book see here.


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