One-man 'crime wave' back in jail

THIS is the serial offender who is today back behind bars after he attacked two policemen just hours after being let out of prison.Darrell Lambert, who has been described as a one-man “crime-wave”, grabbed a kitchen knife before spitting in the faces of police officers, who had to aim taser stun guns at him to make him surrender.

THIS is the serial offender who is today back behind bars after he attacked two policemen just hours after being let out of prison.

Darrell Lambert, who has been described as a one-man “crime-wave”, grabbed a kitchen knife before spitting in the faces of police officers, who had to aim taser stun guns at him to make him surrender.

He has such a bad record police have previously tried to get him kicked out of Ipswich and even his solicitor admits it would be tough to find a person his age in the town who has had more court appearances.

Twenty-year-old Lambert brandished a knife with a six-inch blade during the attack, which also saw him hit his girlfriend and her sister and smash a window at his girlfriend's home.

At South East Suffolk Magistrates' Court yesterday, District Judge David Cooper locked him up and said it was “outrageous violence”.

Lambert, a father of two, pleaded guilty to four charges of assault, one charge of criminal damage and to breaching a licence designed to make him stay out of trouble.

Most Read

Sandra Dyer, prosecuting, said: “He's like a mini crime-wave in Ipswich.”

The latest offences happened on Monday - the day Lambert had been released from Norwich Prison and should have been staying in a bail hostel.

Crime and disorder officers had posted warning leaflets about him returning through doors in the neighbourhood.

But Lambert returned to Ipswich on a train, spent the afternoon with his girlfriend, her sister and his two children, and then went back to his girlfriend's Fletcher Road house.

His girlfriend told police he suddenly went out of control, hit the two women, then went outside and kicked the door and smashed a window with a beer can.

After the incident was reported to police, a Pc went to try to find Lambert. He saw him going into the house where he lives with his 84-year-old grandmother in Hawke Road.

He slammed the door in the policeman's face and grabbed a kitchen knife. He then came out of the front door and dropped the weapon when two other police officers aimed tasers at him. When he was handcuffed he spat in an officer's face.

Ian Duckworth, mitigating, said: “Police and Lambert have a certain antipathy. He had made it clear to probation before his release he didn't want to come out to a bail hostel and even told them 'you will see what I'll do'.

“He's not quite the ogre some may say. He drinks too much. However, you would be hard pushed to find anyone aged 20 with more court appearances in Ipswich.”

What do you think of this case? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk.

DISTRICT Judge David Cooper sentenced Darrell Lambert to four months in prison for each of the assaults and one month for the criminal damage, all which will run alongside each other.

He said the sentences would start after Lambert had gone back and served the rest of his previous sentence, from which he had been released early, which runs until October 15.

The judge also said Lambert would serve 30 days concurrently in prison for the licence breach and that a request for a criminal Asbo (Crasbo) would be heard on September 19.

That application comes after police last month tried to get Lambert banned from the town.

Even before the latest incident he had clocked up 82 convictions, for offences including drink driving, dangerous driving and theft.

His first conviction was when he was just 13 and despite spending just four months out of prison in the last two-and-a-half years he has committed more than 20 offences.

In April and May, Lambert went on a crime spree which saw him steal a series of cars, many of them Ford Fiestas.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter