Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 21°C

min temp: 9°C

Search

Operation cheer-up Ipswich on its way

PUBLISHED: 22:00 24 November 2001 | UPDATED: 10:54 03 March 2010

SCIENTIFIC research shows that Ipswich needs cheering up but help is at hand in the form of 'laugh guards' who will be visiting the town next week.

New research shows that due to the trials and tribulations of modern life people across the country are finding it harder to raise a chuckle.

SCIENTIFIC research shows that Ipswich needs cheering up but help is at hand in the form of 'laugh guards' who will be visiting the town next week.

New research shows that due to the trials and tribulations of modern life people across the country are finding it harder to raise a chuckle.

However the company who conducted the research, Malibu, are attempting to put smiles back on people's faces by sending comics to various venues across the nation.

One of the first stops for the laugh guards will be Ipswich. Next Friday > the comics, including Edinburgh Festival veteran Zeron Gibson, will be popping in pubs in the town to warm the cockles of the apparently miserable Suffolk punters.

Zeron and co will be heading for the town centre nightspots Buddha Bar, Opium Lounge, Ollies, Pals, Curve Bar, Keo Bar, Bar IV.

Interestingly 50 per cent of the people surveyed in Ipswich chose Bob Monkhouse as their favourite comedian, with 60 p.c. of the over 65s citing him as the number one stand-up guy.

Following the research humour psychologist Dr Mike Lowis was used to investigate the nation's humour potential.

The study, entitled A Life Less Serious, revealed Brits are increasingly losing their sense of humour and are in danger of being unable to raise a smile in as little as three generations time.

Dr Lowis believes this is because the left side of the brain, which is associated with creativity, humour and emotion have been neglected while the right side of the brain, used for rational thought, is overworking to keep pace with modern life.

"In order to survive in our increasingly rational and technology-driven society, we need to start to brush the cobwebs off the right hemisphere of the brain. It is high time we adopt the life less serious approach, otherwise we may lose the ability to laugh completely."

Even comedians have backed the report, stand-up comic Mark Blake said: "Comedy is a release for society, but with the changes in the structure of society in the last 20 years, comedy is finding it harder to survive.

"While touring bars in various cities throughout the country, it is apparent that the nation's sense of humour is in severe decline."

Of the 1,000 people surveyed those over 55 showed the biggest capacity to laugh with the 18-24 year olds scoring the lowest on the humour scale.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists