Park snake recovering from cold

A SNAKE which caused a stir by slipping out of an Ipswich park tree is today recovering from a cold.The Evening Star revealed yesterday how a couple's intimate moment at Christchurch Park was interrupted when a four-foot constrictor, believed to be a rat snake, fell out of a tree above them.

A SNAKE which caused a stir by slipping out of an Ipswich park tree is today recovering from a cold.

The Evening Star revealed yesterday how a couple's intimate moment at Christchurch Park was interrupted when a four-foot constrictor, believed to be a rat snake, fell out of a tree above them.

The reptile is being cared for by Ipswich Borough Council arborist Mark Smith, who said it is in good health and recovering from a respiratory problem.

He said: “When I first got the snake it had respiratory problems, its mouth kept gaping open.


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“Now it seems to be getting better.

“It is just like a human getting a cold in cold, damp conditions, which it was it was like early Sunday morning.

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“Now it's being kept in the warm it's cleared up.”

Mr Smith, 39, has not yet fed the snake. The reptiles go for long periods of time without eating, and signs including body weight and excrement show it was not long since the park snake last had food.

The snake also needs to get used to its new surroundings before it will consider eating.

Officials caught the snake after the canoodling couple raised the alarm.

A search for its owners has been launched by rangers.

Mr Smith said: “If someone had lost the snake I'd expect them to have read about it in the Star, or heard from someone who had.

“That's why I think it's probably been dumped.”

Mr Smith has vowed to adopt the snake if the owners do not come forward. He has kept snakes and lizards in the past.

He said: “It's strange as Saturday night I was talking to a friend about how I wanted to get back into keeping snakes - and then the following day I'm told one fell out of a tree.”

Grey rat snakes are non-venomous and grow to about six feet long. They feed on rodents, squirrels and other small mammals as well as frogs, birds and lizards.

n Do you know who the owner could be? Were you and your partner the couple disturbed by the snake? Call The Evening Star newsdesk on 01473 324788 or e-mail starnews@eveningstar.co.uk

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