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Peace tree planted in Ipswich

PUBLISHED: 17:50 29 January 2002 | UPDATED: 15:24 03 March 2010

A SYMBOL of enduring peace is now flourishing in the grounds of Suffolk College.

The olive tree was chosen by Suffolk County Council to mark the Holocaust Memorial Day and the Jewish Festival of Tu B'Shevat because of its multi-faith appeal.

A SYMBOL of enduring peace is now flourishing in the grounds of Suffolk College.

The olive tree was chosen by Suffolk County Council to mark the Holocaust Memorial Day and the Jewish Festival of Tu B'Shevat because of its multi-faith appeal.

The ceremony took place in the grounds of the Ipswich college and was attended by representatives of groups who had suffered under Nazi persecution as well as those who had recently fled persecution.

The college Chaplain, the Reverend Tony Fowler explained that although the Holocaust was a tragedy focussed on the Jewish people, "it had implications for all of us."

The tree was planted by Rev Fowler as well as Suffolk County Council Chairman, Ron Sudds, and Paul Lewis, the Jewish student who first suggested that an olive tree would be a fitting memorial.

His views were echoed by Samuel Duncan from the multi-faith organisation, Suffolk Inter-Faith Resource, who said that an olive tree was a highly significant choice.

"It is an ancient and enduring symbol of peace. Its branches provide shelter and its fruit provides basic sustenance. Enduing peace can be built slowly – through facing the truth and tackling injustice, working together as people of many faiths and cultures and recognising our common humanity, " he said.

Organisers said they were pleased to see such a large number of young people in attendance, particularly as they hoped to raise understanding and awareness of the Holocaust, making young people aware of the suffering of people of different faiths both historically and in present times.

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