People must come before profits

OUR world is a fragile place - yet the rush for profit is putting very real pressure on some of the most threatened places on the planet.In his column on page 16 today Aidan Semmens looks at the plight of the Penan tribe who live in the Malaysian rainforest - who enjoy a way of life largely unchanged for centuries, if not millennia.

OUR world is a fragile place - yet the rush for profit is putting very real pressure on some of the most threatened places on the planet.

In his column on page 16 today Aidan Semmens looks at the plight of the Penan tribe who live in the Malaysian rainforest - who enjoy a way of life largely unchanged for centuries, if not millennia.

The struggle for economic prosperity has also been driven by the rush to profit - and in a very real way it is profit that has made the world go around.

It was the urge to make huge profits that encouraged European explorers to discover America, Africa, Australasia and to open up trade routes to the ancient civilisations of the far east.

While there is nothing inherently wrong in making a profit, the profit motive must be tempered by a sense of social responsibility.

Are we really happy about an ancient way of life on the other side of the world being destroyed so we can use cheap palm oil?

Most Read

There must be other ways for the world to progress. Human society must find a way of doing things better that does not involve destroying cultures that are inconveniently in the way.

The Penan tribe might live an alternative lifestyle to that expected of the rest of the world - but it is not a lifestyle that threatens anyone else and they should be allowed to continue living in that way.

And the same goes for other tribes in the increasingly rare undeveloped areas of the world.

“Civilised” society has developed massively over the last 150 years - and especially in the last half century.

If we want to continue to call ourselves civilised, we have to learn how to allow others to share our world with us.

And the urge to make a profit at all costs must be used to justify the destruction of a precious way of life.

FOR decades the Haughley Bends have been one of the most notorious blackspots in Suffolk.

Speed restrictions imposed a few years ago cut the carnage, but it was always realised that eventually a new road would be needed.

Now that long-awaited new road is being built which should make great improvements for journeys between Ipswich and Bury or Cambridge.

And it is good to know that environmental concerns are being addressed with new passages for badgers and other mammals, and care is being taken to protect slow-worms who live in the area.

The opening of the road in 12 months time should be a red-letter day for residents and motorists alike.

IPSWICH Town fans will have to set their alarm clocks early tonight to make sure they get to Hull in time for the lunchtime kick-off at the KC Stadium.

It really is time that the team started to show some its home form on its travels - and the Humberside club should be the ideal place to start.

There is no reason to fear a visit to Hull - in March the team won 5-2 in its last away victory. A repeat tomorrow would be the perfect way to kick start the season on the road.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter