Photo of paedophile cannot be released

A CONVICTED paedophile who subjected a 14-year-old boy to a sustained attack so brutal it made a witness to the assault physically sick is in jail today.

A CONVICTED paedophile who subjected a 14-year-old boy to a sustained attack so brutal it made a witness to the assault physically sick is in jail today.

But The Evening Star is unable to show our readers what he looks like because the police say his offence wasn't serious enough.

Six-foot four bouncer and former soldier Allen Forsdyke, 31, was sentenced to five months in jail by South East Suffolk Magistrates in Ipswich after admitting a charge of common assault.

The court heard he snatched his 14-year-old victim off the streets and drove him to his Shakespeare Road home in Ipswich before subjecting him to a brutal attack.


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Three years ago Forsdyke was jailed for 12 months after having sex with an under age girl. However there was no sexual element to the assault he is now in prison for.

Giving evidence in court via a video link, the terrified young assault victim described how Forsdyke used plastic ties to handcuff him before frogmarching him to his waiting car.

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He said: "He kicked me in the chest and twisted my neck he asked his girlfriend to get a crowbar to hit my knuckles on the concrete.

"He put his knee on my chest and started twisting my neck. Then he dragged me across the ground leaving marks on my face. I couldn't hear what he was saying because he was screaming so much."

Neighbour Natasha Gillians, who witnessed the assault which happened in June, reported seeing a volley of between 10 and 15 kicks aimed at the boy laid out on the floor.

Forsdyke, who works as a self-employed plasterer, was wearing steel toe capped boots at the time of the attack.

She described Forsdyke – who worked as an Ipswich nightclub bouncer for eight years – as red in the face, with veins popping and spittle coming from his mouth.

She said: "The boy was on the ground and then he lifted him by the scruff of his neck. He was crying and very distressed. It made me physically sick, literally."

Forsdyke's stepfather, Michael who also witnessed the attack, described the victim, who cannot be named for legal reasons, as "screaming like a stuffed pig."

When asked why he did nothing to stop the attack, Michael Forsdyke said he thought his stepson was teaching the boy a lesson following a dispute over a digital camera.

In court Forsdyke admitted hitting the boy but denied the severity of the attack.

He said: "I smacked him twice with my open palms on both hands. If I had really punched him, I would have killed him."

Defending, Roger Stewart told the court the bruising to the victim's side wasn't consistent with repeated kicks from steel toe capped boots.

Prosecutor Andrew Fitch-Holland described the attack as, "an exercise in crass brutality."

Forsdyke can expect to be released from prison in January with good behaviour – he could even be allowed out for Christmas at home.

Defending the decision not to issue a photograph of Forsdyke, Suffolk Police spokeswoman Anna Woolnough said: "Police photographs of offenders are taken for internal police use only. They can only be released to the media when certain strict criteria are met.

"Those criteria include factors such as the seriousness of the crime.

The Media Advisory Group (MAG) recommendation is that only crimes attracting a penalty of three years imprisonment or more warrant the release of a photograph.

"Photos can only be released when an offender has been remanded in custody from the time of arrest and the media have not had the opportunity to take their own photograph. With regard to this particular request, none of the basic criteria were met and we were not in a position to release a photograph."

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