Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 8°C

min temp: 3°C

Search

Days Gone By: Dock area was for recreation before industry claimed it in the 1920s and 1930s

PUBLISHED: 16:30 04 December 2018 | UPDATED: 10:03 05 December 2018

The tree lined site between the Dock, off to the left, and New Cut around 1900 Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The tree lined site between the Dock, off to the left, and New Cut around 1900 Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

Dave Kindred

When it was proposed in 1836 to build an enclosed dock in Ipswich, provision had to be made to take the flow of the river past the development, writes David Kindred.

The walls of New Cut were strengthened in the 1970s. The recently completed tidal barrier, built to protect much of the Waterfront and the town centre from the threat of flooding from a tidal surge, now stands here Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe walls of New Cut were strengthened in the 1970s. The recently completed tidal barrier, built to protect much of the Waterfront and the town centre from the threat of flooding from a tidal surge, now stands here Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

Much of the work on the new canal was completed in 1840 and only the lock gates, then off New Cut, needed completion.

There was criticism of the whole project to build the dock with local newspaper, the Ipswich Journal, saying what they thought of as slow progress:

“As putting off the evil day when this ill considered and rashly undertaken plan shall be called completed.”

The Ipswich Regatta was an annual event attracting thousands of spectators and competitors. This photograph from New Cut West looks across the water to New Cut East where hundreds have gathered by the Umbrella shelter to watch events. Cobbolds Cliff Quay brewery is in the background. This brewery was completed in 1896 and extended in 1904. This photograph was taken in the 1890s Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe Ipswich Regatta was an annual event attracting thousands of spectators and competitors. This photograph from New Cut West looks across the water to New Cut East where hundreds have gathered by the Umbrella shelter to watch events. Cobbolds Cliff Quay brewery is in the background. This brewery was completed in 1896 and extended in 1904. This photograph was taken in the 1890s Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

When the lock gates were closed for the first time on January 22, 1842, the whole project to build the Dock and New Cut cost in the region of £130,000.

Both sides of New Cut were lined with trees and the island site had a promenade and an avenue of lime and poplar trees extending over the lower dam into Ship Launch Road. The lock was moved to where it is now, cutting through the dam, opening July 27, 1881.

In today’s Days Gone By I have taken a look back through my archive to a time when New Cut, Ipswich, was a leisure area, and how it was lost when the area was industrialised in the 1920s and 30s.

Among the public houses lost to the Stoke area of Ipswich was The Griffin which stood at the junction of New Cut West and Bath Street, Ipswich. It closed in April 1951. It was demolished and Ransomes and Rapier extended their engineering works onto the site Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDAmong the public houses lost to the Stoke area of Ipswich was The Griffin which stood at the junction of New Cut West and Bath Street, Ipswich. It closed in April 1951. It was demolished and Ransomes and Rapier extended their engineering works onto the site Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

Do you have memories of New Cut, Ipswich, you would like to share with readers? Write to David Kindred, Days Gone By, Ipswich Star/EADT, Portman House, 120 Princes Street, Ipswich, IP1 1RS, or you can send an e-mail here.

The Umbrella shelter stood at the end of the island site close to where the lock opened in 1881. There was a view from the seats and shelter looking down river to where Cliff Quay is now Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe Umbrella shelter stood at the end of the island site close to where the lock opened in 1881. There was a view from the seats and shelter looking down river to where Cliff Quay is now Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The view across New Cut in the 1970s as the river walls were extended. Cliff Quay and the Tolly Cobbold brewery is in the background  Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe view across New Cut in the 1970s as the river walls were extended. Cliff Quay and the Tolly Cobbold brewery is in the background Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

Sacks of malt being loaded onto a barge at New Cut West, Ipswich, around 1930. The Lock Tavern on New Cut East is in the left background Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDSacks of malt being loaded onto a barge at New Cut West, Ipswich, around 1930. The Lock Tavern on New Cut East is in the left background Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The Steamboat Tavern at the corner of New Cut West and Felaw Street, Ipswich, in June 1948. All of the houses on the left of the picture have gone. The Steamboat is the only public house still trading along either side of New Cut Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe Steamboat Tavern at the corner of New Cut West and Felaw Street, Ipswich, in June 1948. All of the houses on the left of the picture have gone. The Steamboat is the only public house still trading along either side of New Cut Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The promenade along New Cut East, Ipswich, around 1900, as a paddle steamer arrives on the service between Ipswich and Felixstowe Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe promenade along New Cut East, Ipswich, around 1900, as a paddle steamer arrives on the service between Ipswich and Felixstowe Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

A barge sailing along New Cut, Ipswich, in the 1890s. Both sides of the river were then tree lined. This photograph was taken from New Cut East, looking towards Stoke Bridge Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDA barge sailing along New Cut, Ipswich, in the 1890s. Both sides of the river were then tree lined. This photograph was taken from New Cut East, looking towards Stoke Bridge Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The paddle steamer Essex in New Cut, Ipswich, early in the last century. There was three paddle boats on the service to Felixstowe and Harwich, the Suffolk, Norfolk and Essex. The service was started by the Great Eastern Railway company and ran until the 1930s. In the foreground is the foot passenger ferry service which ran across New Cut until the 1950s Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe paddle steamer Essex in New Cut, Ipswich, early in the last century. There was three paddle boats on the service to Felixstowe and Harwich, the Suffolk, Norfolk and Essex. The service was started by the Great Eastern Railway company and ran until the 1930s. In the foreground is the foot passenger ferry service which ran across New Cut until the 1950s Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The Lock Tavern on New Cut East, Ipswich, closed in 1955. It stood close to the original lock to the dock  Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDThe Lock Tavern on New Cut East, Ipswich, closed in 1955. It stood close to the original lock to the dock Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

Steam powered boats in New Cut, Ipswich, around 1900. On the left is the passenger boat Norfolk and the Stour is on the right. The tug Era in the centre. New Cut East is in the background  Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDREDSteam powered boats in New Cut, Ipswich, around 1900. On the left is the passenger boat Norfolk and the Stour is on the right. The tug Era in the centre. New Cut East is in the background Picture: SUPPLIED BY DAVID KINDRED

The Orwell Hotel stood at the junction of New Cut West and Bright Street, Ipswich. Picture: SUPPLIED BY GEOFFREY DODSONThe Orwell Hotel stood at the junction of New Cut West and Bright Street, Ipswich. Picture: SUPPLIED BY GEOFFREY DODSON

By the time this photograph was taken of a diesel locomotive pulling wagons along New Cut East, Ipswich, in January 1964, all traces of trees and a promenade had gone.  Photo: ALAN VALENTINEBy the time this photograph was taken of a diesel locomotive pulling wagons along New Cut East, Ipswich, in January 1964, all traces of trees and a promenade had gone. Photo: ALAN VALENTINE

Local bands featured ina recent Days Gone By and a reader has sent a photo of one of the line-ups he featured in. Local guitarist Paul Glazebrook sent this photograph of Unit 4 taken in 1963. Paul said The photo shows Unit 4 prior to an appearance on BBCs 625 show, hosted by Sir Jimmy Young, in 1963. The band was, from the left, Morton Lewis. Paul Glazebrook Gerry Gillings and John Game.Local bands featured ina recent Days Gone By and a reader has sent a photo of one of the line-ups he featured in. Local guitarist Paul Glazebrook sent this photograph of Unit 4 taken in 1963. Paul said The photo shows Unit 4 prior to an appearance on BBCs 625 show, hosted by Sir Jimmy Young, in 1963. The band was, from the left, Morton Lewis. Paul Glazebrook Gerry Gillings and John Game.

The independent body responsible for triple murderer David McGreavy’s release has insisted it will never free dangerous criminals until it is “convinced” it is safe to do so.

Views being submitted over a “compromise” design for the £3million restoration of a historic Suffolk pier will be discussed next month.

In his latest column, Suffolk police chief constable GARETH WILSON looks at the highs and lows of policing at Christmas - and how you can prevent yourself becoming a victim of crime during the festive season.

One dog at a Suffolk RSPCA centre is facing a second Christmas without a “forever home”.

The Shotley peninsula community is at its best when it’s working together, says this week’s community hero Rosemary Diplock.

The number of people visiting Ipswich Cornhill has increased significantly since refurbishment work finished at the start of November, according to new measuring devices in the town centre.

Colchester’s latest development beyond the A12 can coexist with the town centre without competing - says the town’s MP.

New data has revealed a number of major faults at abattoirs and cutting plants across the county – highlighting serious issues with contamination, food safety and animal suffering.

After she lost her parents 30 years ago, Val Mann was faced with the pain of living with loneliness and depression.

Suffolk police have thanked the public for their help in locating a missing woman in a rural village.

Most read

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists

Topic pages

Newsletter Sign Up

Ipswich Star daily newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

MyDate24 MyPhotos24