Planes continue to blight Suffolk sky

PLANES are flying over the Felixstowe peninsula at the rate of more than one every two minutes, according to a new snap survey.

PLANES are flying over the Felixstowe peninsula at the rate of more than one every two minutes, according to a new snap survey.

With the number of jets currently down by around 15 per cent because of the recession according to experts, the numbers would normally be far higher - and the noise levels even worse.

With the aircraft less than two minutes apart, it means the roar of one plane is often still subsiding as the noise from the next arrives, leaving a constant dull rumble in the skies.

The two-hour survey was carried out at Trimley St Martin and St Mary by the Evening Star, counting planes visible going across the village in all directions and at different heights - sometimes two or three planes at the same time at different levels.


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In one 15-minute period during the peak time there were a staggering 25 planes in and out.

The survey was carried out between 6pm and 8pm and 77 planes were seen during this time.

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These did not include dozens of others which were flying on different flightpaths across parts of Old Felixstowe and the seafront.

Residents in Suffolk are becoming increasingly frustrated at the noise from jet planes ruining the county's peace and tranquillity and are anxiously waiting for air traffic management company NATS to reveal its revised plans for future flightpaths.

The company has promised that less people will be affected by planes in the future when the airspace is reorganised.

Flights from Stansted - most of which fly over Suffolk - were down 18 per cent in April, and NATS said it handled 11pc less plane movements at all the airports for which it carries out air traffic control.

Are you annoyed by the increasing number of planes in our skies? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

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