Pollution warning in Ipswich

STAY away from three pollution hotspots in IpswichThat was the advice for people with breathing difficulties today from a senior councillor as officials in the town prepare to grapple with traffic problems as more people move into the area.

STAY away from three pollution hotspots in Ipswich

That was the advice for people with breathing difficulties today from a senior councillor as officials in the town prepare to grapple with traffic problems as more people move into the area.

Liberal Democrat group leader and council economic development spokesman Richard Atkins said scientists had identified three places in the town where pollution was particularly bad.

He said: “Frankly the advice to people with asthma, to pregnant women, and to people with young children is 'stay away from these places.'

“Pollution is a real problem in the Key Street area, on St Margaret's Plain, and in Chevalier Street near the junction with Norwich Road.

“They are all areas where you get a build-up of stationary traffic as it waits at traffic lights or at junctions.”

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Air quality was monitored around the town all the time, and those were the three areas where there was serious concern about pollution throughout the year.

Mr Atkins warned that unless people used cars less to get around Ipswich, the problem could extend to other parts of the town centre.

He said: “The town is expanding, and most people want Ipswich to continue to expand - but if people use more and more cars then the pollution problems are going to get worse.”

The proposed changes to the Key Street area have been criticised by many people as likely to cause more congestion, more stationary traffic, and more pollution.

Mr Atkins remained convinced that the most serious issue which had to be faced was getting people out of their cars.

“We have to look at alternatives to driving everywhere - and creating better walking links between the town centre and Waterfront is crucial.

“I'm sure that as the Waterfront continues to expand, there will be more natural pedestrian flows between the town centre and that area - and we do have to reduce the amount of traffic polluting the area around there.”

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