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Price to pay for recycling

PUBLISHED: 19:37 17 December 2001 | UPDATED: 11:02 03 March 2010

THE cost of collecting household waste in the Suffolk Coastal area could rise by more than £100,000 because of the need to increase recycling.

Although the council is one of the top authorities in the country for recycling materials, it will have to improve even further after agreeing to sign up to a set of tough new performance targets.

THE cost of collecting household waste in the Suffolk Coastal area could rise by more than £100,000 because of the need to increase recycling.

Although the council is one of the top authorities in the country for recycling materials, it will have to improve even further after agreeing to sign up to a set of tough new performance targets.

The council – which covers Felixstowe, Woodbridge, The Trimleys, Martlesham and Kesgrave – has agreed to work in partnership with other major public organisations in the county.

It will see councils, police, and health services draw up a Suffolk Public Service Agreement (SPSA) to improve services and attract an extra £14 million Government funding into Suffolk.

But if they proceed with the SPSA, Suffolk councils would have to substantially increase recycling by 2004.

In Suffolk Coastal, it would raise the cost of waste collection by well over £100,000.

Another issue to be addressed would be services to help more older people live independent lives, and so speed up the discharge from hospital of elderly patients – the so-called "bed-blocking" problem.

Council leader, Ray Herring, said the partnership project was the latest Government initiative to offer councils a financial incentive to make real improvements in local services and tackle some key issues.

The consortium drawing up the Suffolk bid has set 13 draft targets covering issues like health, crime, employment, drugs, road safety, education, recycling, efficiency, and public transport.

"Some of the issues Suffolk Coastal has no direct influence over but there are areas in which we are ready to play an active part in service improvement," said Mr Herring.

"These do need careful planning and consideration as they will potentially need significant investment of funding and officer time to be realistically achievable."

A united approach across the county's services would see improvements made to elderly people's homes to make them warmer and secure, with the promise of back-up visiting support if necessary.

More supported housing schemes will also be built, so that people can move back into the community, to live their own lives again but with the safety net of round the clock care and support. Three new very sheltered housing schemes have been identified, one of which would be at the Seckford Almshouses in Woodbridge.

"This council has already set aside some money as a catalyst for the Woodbridge scheme, which has won backing from the Housing Corporation, private finance and the Seckford Foundation, and under the SPSA the county council may put in £650,000 so that it can get underway," added Mr Herring.

"This is one example of how the SPSA will bring all the partners together to work as one to bring about real improvements, and we intend to bring similar thinking to public transport and council efficiency."

WEBLINK

www.suffolkcoastal.gov.uk


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