Prime Minister praises Wright police

PRIME Minister Gordon Brown has today praised the “professionalism and dedication” of the police and prosecutors involved in convicting serial killer Steve Wright.

Danielle Nuttall

PRIME Minister Gordon Brown has today praised the “professionalism and dedication” of the police and prosecutors involved in convicting serial killer Steve Wright.

Former publican Wright, of London Road, Ipswich, was jailed for the rest of his life on Friday for the murders of Tania Nicol, 19, Gemma Adams, 25, Anneli Alderton, 24, Paula Clennell, 24, and Annette Nicholls, 29.

A jury found him guilty on all counts in less than eight hours following a six-week trial.


You may also want to watch:


The naked bodies of the five women were found in isolated spots around Ipswich over a 10-day period in December 2006.

Forensic analysis revealed Wright's DNA on three of the women and fibres linking him to all five, the jury was told.

Most Read

Police arrested Wright after receiving a chance DNA hit on the national database. Wright's DNA had been placed on the database after he was convicted of theft some years earlier.

Prime Minister told the Commons the case showed the importance of the national DNA database, which had helped catch 452 murderers.

At Prime Minister's question time, he said the database allowed the capture of people who “otherwise may go free”.

Mr Brown's comments came as a test case was being heard by the European Court of Human Rights on whether suspects cleared of crimes could have their DNA record removed from the database.

Ipswich MP Chris Mole condemned the “foul murders” and said the DNA evidence was key to catching Wright.

Mr Brown said: “Our country is very proud of the professionalism and dedication that the police and all the prosecuting authorities show.”

He added: “The DNA database produced matches that allowed for us to be able to prosecute in the case of 452 homicides, 644 rapes, 222 other sex offences and 1,800 other violent crimes all in the last year.

“I think that shows that we are in a position to make best use of the DNA database to catch those people who otherwise may go free.

“I hope other parties will reconsider their opposition to the 2003 Act which extended the DNA database to the benefit of successful prosecutions.”

Both Wright and Mark Dixie, who killed Sally Anne Bowman, were both caught because their DNA had been taken in connection with unrelated offences.

In the European Court of Human Rights, two Britons have launched a landmark challenge to have their DNA samples destroyed.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter