Protester chains himself to lorry

A PROTESTOR who chained himself to the undercarriage of a lorry was being questioned by police today.The man arrested was one of eight people waging a continued campaign against Scotts, which currently produces and packages granular and liquid garden fertilizers and weed-killers in Paper Mill Lane, Bramford.

By Tracey Sparling

tracey.sparling@eveningstar.co.uk

A DEMONSTRATOR is to appear in court later this week charged with causing harassment during a protest at Bramford.

Andrew Woodcock, of Nottingham, chained himself to the undercarriage of a lorry before being arrested by police.


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The 26-year-old is due to appear before magistrates in Ipswich on January 17.

Woodcock was one of eight people who campaigning against Scotts, which currently produces and packages granular and liquid garden fertilizers and weed-killers in Paper Mill Lane, Bramford.

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The protestors claimed the firm was helping destroy peat bogs by using peat from Hatfield Moor and locations in Europe – but today the company said it was at the forefront of trying to find viable alternatives, and worked with the government body English Nature.

Woodcock was arrested by police after he chained himself to the undercarriage of a lorry making a delivery.

Other protestors used a similar D-lock device to keep the gates of Scott's yard closed.

The incident caused traffic problems and emergency crews had to be drafted in to disperse the protestors.

Police tried to remove the locks with bolt croppers but in the end heavier-duty cutting gear from the fire brigade was needed.

Two crews were called to the incident, which lasted from 11.15am to 3.30pm yesterday.

Inspector Steve Brown, of Suffolk Police, said at the scene: "One man had managed to fix himself to the underside of a lorry making a delivery. Another D-lock was used on the gates, which caused inconvenience to operations here.

"It was a peaceful protest. One man was arrested and taken to Stowmarket police station."

Claire Dixon, spokeswoman for Scotts said: "We are surprised at these protests, as Scotts has responsible extraction policies and transferred over its biggest and best sites at Thorne, Wedholme and the majority of Hatfield – over 85 per cent of the land in question – in 2002 in an agreement with English Nature.

"Scotts is also actively working with English Nature on leading-edge restoration projects on this site.

n A decision was taken in November 2002 to close the manufacturing side of Scotts Bramford plant by the summer of this year but the office dealing with administration, research and development and technology will continue in Paper Mill Lane.

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