Search

Racist recruit dismissed from police

PUBLISHED: 06:20 31 January 2004 | UPDATED: 14:51 03 March 2010

A REVIEW of the way Suffolk Police tackles prejudice within its ranks, has revealed that one racist recruit had to be dismissed.

The force's spotlight on its ongoing procedures to stamp out racism, comes in wake of the BBC's controversial documentary 'The Secret Policeman.

A REVIEW of the way Suffolk Police tackles prejudice within its ranks, has revealed that one racist recruit had to be dismissed.

The force's spotlight on its ongoing procedures to stamp out racism, comes in wake of the BBC's controversial documentary 'The Secret Policeman.' Screened in October last year, it exposed racism among recruits within Greater Manchester Police.

Suffolk chief constable Alastair McWhirter said: "From the television documentary, and from experience, recruits are more likely to reveal their true nature in extended residential training, where they have to interact on a social as well as a work level in a more informal atmosphere.

"Where an individual from Suffolk revealed such tendencies post recruitment, the constabulary responded appropriately by dismissing the individual."

He added in a report to Suffolk Police Authority's equal opportunities and diversity committee: "The Suffolk experience is that peers are ready and willing to challenge and report inappropriate language and behaviour to line managers, or trainers, which is a sign of messages being received and a positive change in attitudes generally."

The Secret Policeman showed one of the rookies expressing a desire to kill an Asian, as well as claiming that Hitler had 'the right idea.'

In the wake of the programme, Suffolk Police reassured the public that the force would not tolerate racism of any kind among its officers, but in November , police authority bosses were warned they would be foolish to assume racism had been stamped out of the county's police force.

The Association of Chief Police Officers agreed a seven-point plan, and Mr McWhirter met a member of the Black Police Association to identify any local issues.

The news comes as the Home Office, ACPO and the Association of Police Authorities launched an action plan aimed at helping forces employ, retain and promote more

minority ethnic officers to make the police service more representative of

the communities it serves.

'Breaking Through' was produced by the Lawrence Steering Group, and provides a framework for all forces to examine performance and identify anything which stops equality.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Ipswich Star. Click the link in the orange box below for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years, through good times and bad, serving as your advocate and trusted source of local information. Our industry is facing testing times, which is why I’m asking for your support. Every single contribution will help us continue to produce award-winning local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Thank you.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star