Resident horrified at size of ski slope

A RESIDENT living near to the proposed SnOasis development today said he could not believe the size that the ski slope would be.Ken Southall from Aspen College, Nettlestead spoke out at the SnOasis public inquiry today.

A RESIDENT living near to the proposed SnOasis development today said he could not believe the size that the ski slope would be.

Ken Southall from Aspen College, Nettlestead spoke out at the SnOasis public inquiry today.

He told how he had made a computerised image of the ski slope which showed it towering over villages such as Little Blakenham, Claydon and Nettlestead.

He said: “I just couldn't believe how big it was. I thought I had done it wrong but I can assure you I have double-checked it”.

Mr Southall who moved into the Suffolk village in 1977 has recently become part of the SnOasis Committee Alliance.

He said in June last year a helium balloon measuring 20 foot by eight foot by eight foot was flown above the proposed site with the words SnOasis Concern.

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He then took 45 photographs from various locations of the balloon in the air. From there he made a computerised model of the ski slope and placed it where the balloon was in the sky.

In one shot he showed the slope in comparison to the controversial Agilent building on the outskirts of Ipswich.

He said: “Public opposition has increased since I have filed my own investigation on the visual impact this development will bring”.

However, he later admitted the balloon was flown ten metres higher than the slope will be and the location was slightly away from the exact spot.

At yesterday's hearing, one of the country's top tourism experts said that the venture would fail within the first five yeas of opening its doors.

Michael Jolly normally champions multi-million pound tourism projects but found himself putting forward the case for the opposition because he believes the £300 million winter sports complex will not be financially viable.

He believes it is in the wrong place, will not attract the visitors it needs, and will not bring in the income it requires to make it a success.

“The business plan includes £56.8m income from 590,000 visitors,” said Mr Jolly, former chairman and chief executive of the Tussaud Group, former chairman of Star Parks in Belgium, and currently boss of a group of UK holiday parks.

“I know of no leisure destination in the UK that gets anywhere near 590,000 people a year - every man, woman and child - spending £100 per head.

“I think this project will fail. Not in the first year, but certainly within five years. That concerns me greatly.”

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