Residents lost for the right word

RESIDENTS of a Stowmarket street were lost for words today after a road name intended to salute a renowned writer was spelt incorrectly.Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Thackeray are among the famous people to be honoured with a road named after them on the town's fast-growing Chilton Hall estate.

RESIDENTS of a Stowmarket street were lost for words today after a road name intended to salute a renowned writer was spelt incorrectly.

Shakespeare, Wordsworth and Thackeray are among the famous people to be honoured with a road named after them on the town's fast-growing Chilton Hall estate.

The theme was part of a council move to salute influential artists, musicians and writers, but mystery has always surrounded the christening of Priestly Close.

Families in the quiet cul-de-sac thought it was intended to be a tribute to the famous playwright, journalist and novelist JB Priestley.

So when a Priestly Close sign was put up a number of weeks ago, many dismissed it as a mistake and continued to spell their address 'ley instead of 'ly.

But they started to take more notice when another of the "incorrectly" spelt signs was put up, within the last week.

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After being approached by The Evening Star, Stowmarket Town Council today admitted the road was in fact intended as a tribute to the late Mr Priestley.

Malcolm Baker, town clerk, even offered to liase with the residents about changing it.

He said: "I suspect it's an error with the sign itself and it was meant to be spelt 'ley. The signs are provided by Mid Suffolk District Council and this will probably have to be changed."

Keen-eyed delivery driver Gary Miller, 47, of Northfield Road, Onehouse, always assumed the spelling was wrong.

He said: "It's quite amusing really but it has certainly left the residents scratching their heads.

"I've had numerous deliveries to the close and they've always been spelt 'ley. Perhaps they will have to change now."

Resident Barry Robinson, 57, added: "I've often wondered about it, but haven't chased it any further.

"To get a literary name wrong and then to do it twice is quite embarrassing. There are many arty names around here and the fact this road is in that company makes it so obviously wrong."

Another resident, who did not want to be named, said: "The people who put it there don't know their English history."

Kipling, Ruskin and Masefield are just some of the many other famous names who have had roads named after them in a move designed to add a touch of culture to the newly-built estate.

Do you know of a similar example to this? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk or join the forum at www.eveningstar.co.uk

FASTfacts: JB Priestley

September 13, 1894: John Priestley born.

1910: Leaves school aged 15 and starts writing under the name John Boynton Priestley.

1927: Publication of his first novel entitled Adam in Moonshine.

1940: During World War II became the presenter of Postscripts, a BBC Radio programme that was listened to by approximately 40 per cent of the British population.

1973: Granted freedom of the City of Bradford.

1976: Wrote the last of his novels called Found, Lost, Found.

1977: Awarded the Order of Merit.

August 14, 1984: Dies aged 89.

Source: www.jbpriestley.co.uk

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