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Learn to be a Lifesaver - first responder urges public to sign up for free CPR training

PUBLISHED: 19:00 17 February 2019 | UPDATED: 19:27 17 February 2019

Dr Jeremy Mauger from SARS is backing the Learn to be a Lifesaver campaign Picture: SUPPLIED BY JEREMY MAUGER

Dr Jeremy Mauger from SARS is backing the Learn to be a Lifesaver campaign Picture: SUPPLIED BY JEREMY MAUGER

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Medical first responder Dr Jeremy Mauger sees the vital importance of CPR every week - and is urging people to learn for free through our new Learn to be a Lifesaver campaign.

Volunteer first responder Dr Jeremy Mauger is also an anaesthetist at the West Suffolk Hospital PIcture: ANDY ABBOTTVolunteer first responder Dr Jeremy Mauger is also an anaesthetist at the West Suffolk Hospital PIcture: ANDY ABBOTT

Dr Mauger volunteers with the Suffolk Accident and Rescue Service (SARS) as well as the East Anglian Air Ambulance, and has treated hundreds of critically ill patients across the county.

He said he has seen first-hand the difference it makes to the likelihood of survival if someone knows and administers CPR before he arrives on scene.

“At the moment the actual survival rate if you have a cardiac arrest in the street is less than one in ten,” he said.

“It increases dramatically by five times if you have bystander CPR.

“I go to cardiac arrests every week.

“I see it both with SARS and with the East Anglian Air Ambulance.

“Overwhelmingly the people that survive are the ones helped by bystander CPR.

“People worry are they doing the right thing - ‘should I try CPR?’.

“If you do have training you are three or four times more likely to do it in real life.”

Dr Mauger, who also works as an anaesthetist at West Suffolk Hospital, said early CPR can be the difference between life and death.

“Only this week I had a patient whose wife did early CPR and he had an incredible response,” he said.

“Without the initial CPR the stuff we bring on the chopper isn’t going to help as much as it could.

“Unfortunately only 40% of the population will do CPR if they are not told how to do it.”

He said that if your are trained in CPR you are far more likely to come to someone’s aid when faced with a medical emergency in real life.

SARS is a medical charity was set up in Suffolk in 1972.

It provides volunteer clinicians wto treat the most critically ill or injured patients before they reach hospital.

Around 20% of SARS responses are to patients in cardiac arrest.

Alongside BBC Radio Suffolk, the East Anglian Daily Times and Ipswich Star are organising free CPR training sessions across Suffolk with the aim of increasing the number confident in carrying it out.

To book your place on a CPR session email Suffolk.CPR@bbc.co.uk

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