Seaman receives medal - 63 years late

A WORLD War Two seaman is today the proud owner of a medal - sixty-three years late.William Bugg senior served on the Arctic convoys taking vital supplies to the Red Army.

A WORLD War Two seaman is today the proud owner of a medal - sixty-three years late.

William Bugg senior served on the Arctic convoys taking vital supplies to the Red Army.

His son, William Bugg junior, 52, of Dales Road, said: “I saw an article in a national paper and chased it up on the internet.

“Anyone who served on the convoys for more than sixth months received a medal.


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“I got the forms and we helped Dad fill out them out.

“I think it is the least they deserve. What they were doing was very dangerous.”

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The Russian government wished to honour those who helped deliver equipment and food via the Arctic Ocean to Murmansk.

Mr Bugg senior, 85, of Cavan Road, in the Whitehouse estate in Ipswich, served on the HMS Orwell.

He said: “Towns in the country adopted a ship and the people in Ipswich named theirs the Orwell.

“It was perishing in those seas, mind.”

Crews had to spend most of their time the chipping ice off the ship to stop it becoming top heavy and capsizing.

The war veteran also served in Korea.

But there is one problem with the medal - it's in Russian.

Mr Bugg junior said: “None of us know what it says but fortunately there is a Polish barmaid at my local pub so she is going to translate it.”

After leaving the navy in 1953 Mr Bugg senior joined Trinity House and served on the light ships.

Following four years there he moved to Harris's Bacon Factory and retired in 1971.

He has four children, David, William, Sylvia and Denise, five grand-children and ten great-grandchildren.

Wife Irene, 85, stayed at home to raise their young family and then worked in Better Bakes Bakery until retirement in 1981.

Mr Bugg is keen to try and contact some of his old Navy pals. Anyone who served with him should contact him on 01473 747016

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