Silence falls for terror victims

EUROPE came to a standstill today as a mark of respect for the victims of the London terror attacks.One week on from the atrocities which claimed 52 lives, people across the country marked two minutes' silence at 12 noon with trains, planes, buses, and even the London Stock Exchange stopping in a show of solidarity.

EUROPE came to a standstill today as a mark of respect for the victims of the London terror attacks.

One week on from the atrocities which claimed 52 lives, people across the country marked two minutes' silence at 12 noon with trains, planes, buses, and even the London Stock Exchange stopping in a show of solidarity.

The silence was also observed across the European Union.

In Ipswich staff at the Jessop's store in the Buttermarket, fell silent to remember their missing colleague 21-year-old Richard Ellery.

It is feared Mr Ellery, who lived in Ipswich, is one of the victims of last Thursday's attacks on the capital as he made his way to a staff training day.

Jessop's closed all of it's 280 stores - including two in Ipswich for the two minute silence.

Most Read

David Gunn, manager of the Jessop's branch in the Buttermarket where Mr Ellery worked, said staff were going through a difficult time and that shutting the doors of the shop to take part in the silence was an important part of the grieving process.

"Most of the staff seem to be coping but if I'm honest we are on auto-pilot," Mr Gunn said.

"It is difficult to keep going but we try and do the best we can."

Mr Gunn added that he was in regular contact with Mr Ellery's family and the company wanted to offer support to them in any way they could.

In a statement released by Jessops, personnel director Theresa Wilde said: "As a company Jessops has been keeping in contact with Richard's family and are offering support at this difficult time.

Also today faith and community leaders showed a united front against the threat of racism or terrorism in Suffolk.

Representatives from faith groups, the county council and Suffolk police stood firm together at a conference held today at Suffolk College.

While the Right Reverend Richard Lewis and Suffolk Police Chief Inspector Julian Blazeby spoke of the need for tolerance and calm, one Muslim group spokesman had a strong message.

Mojlum Khan, a Muslim writer and spokesman for the Muslim community in Suffolk, said: "It is a very difficult time to be a Muslim and I would be kidding myself if I said otherwise. I feel shocked, appalled and horrified by what has happened."

Chief Inspector Julian Blazeby said there had been a small increase in verbal attacks on Muslims since last Thursday's attacks "but thankfully there hasn't been a great problem".

And The Right Reverend Richard Lewis said the time had come when people from all backgrounds should show a united front. "We have to be very clear that the Muslim community is as much a victim in this as everybody else."

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter