Silent Connor is a kid in a million

IT WAS a treat in a million for a Kid in a Million.Little Connor Reed took pride of place on Santa's sled for a dream ride round Ipswich town centre.

IT WAS a treat in a million for a Kid in a Million.

Little Connor Reed took pride of place on Santa's sled for a dream ride round Ipswich town centre.

The angel-faced toddler was born with a tumour in his throat that has robbed him of speech.

He is now learning sign language – but all he needed was his beaming smile to show everyone how much he enjoyed his day in the limelight.


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Mum Lorraine said: "I don't know what I'm going to do now – I've been using this to blackmail him to get him to behave.

"He's been excited all week and he's learned how to say Father Christmas in sign language.

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"He likes the reindeer, but mostly he loves the sleigh."

Connor was chosen as The Evening Star and Buttermarket Kid in a Million with great difficulty from a host of extra-special children who are winning their own personal battles every day.

And the ride with Santa was just part of his big day out.

After the ride he was whisked into the Buttermarket for some much-deserved early Christmas presents.

Hundreds of people packed the streets to watch Santa's procession set out from the Buttermarket's depot in Falcon Street.

The Royal Hospital School band provided some stirring marching music and the guard of honour was provided by the Ipswich Sea Cadets.

But if Santa was supposed to be the main attraction, he was unstaged by his furry friends.

The reindeer sled-pullers had already been on a fair old journey from their grazing grounds in the Cairngorms of Scotland.

And it was certainly appreciated if the cooing of the crowd was anything to go by.

Poor old Popeye and Biscuit had obviously pulled the short straw as they were doing the donkey work out front.

Buttermarket organisers of the event were delighted with the turn-out, describing it as easily the best ever for the annual event.

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