Smuggler deported from Suffolk

COCAINE smuggler Devon Giles is back in his native Jamaica today, after being thrown out of Britain – three years after serving his prison sentence.His wife and daughter today say they have been left bereft, after he was deported last weekend as part of his sentence.

COCAINE smuggler Devon Giles is back in his native Jamaica today, after being thrown out of Britain – three years after serving his prison sentence.

His wife and daughter today say they have been left bereft, after he was deported last weekend as part of his sentence.

His wife Pamula Giles, 33, could hardly control her tears as she described how her husband of almost four years was put on a plane and sent away.

Mrs Giles, who lives with Giles' 16-year-old daughter Julieann in their Beatty Road home in Ipswich, said: "How am I supposed to feel? I am numb, I am hurting, I am angry.


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"I went all the way to Harwich [on Saturday] and they wouldn't even let me see him - not for five minutes."

Mrs Giles first met her husband when she went on holiday to Jamaica more than ten years ago - and when she returned they kept in touch through letters and phone calls.

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But on one of his visits to England, Giles was caught smuggling cocaine into the country.

He served four years in HMP Swaleside on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent - where he married his wife on December 9 1999 - before being released in 2001.

He had been told he would be deported as soon as he left prison, but in May 2001 the Star reported how the family were still waiting to hear whether they would have to leave immediately.

Last Saturday, Giles - a 38-year-old Jamaican citizen - was finally deported after reporting for his weekly sign-in at Ipswich police station on Thursday .

Meanwhile his daughter, a Jamaican citizen who at present does not have a British passport, is hoping to remain with her stepmother.

Mrs Giles claimed: "His mum and dad had got into debt problems in Jamaica, but when they died, it got passed onto him. They [the debtors] threatened to kill his children if he didn't smuggle the drugs.

"Devon felt guilty. He was glad when he got caught because he didn't want the drugs to go on the streets and harm anybody."

The deportation is the second trauma the family has faced - in 2001, Giles' younger daughter Josieann, died of a rare form of brain cancer aged nine.

Mrs Giles and Julieann are now desperate to visit Giles in Jamaica.

Giles is unable to appeal against his court-recommended deportation, because he was sentenced before the new Immigration Act in April.

A Home office spokesman said: "Prior to April 1 2003, persons liable to deportation on the basis of a court recommendation had no separate right of appeal to the Home Secretary against the decision to deport, only to the sentencing court.

"After April 1, the new Immigration Act provided a right of appeal to the Home Secretary against the decision to deport for all deportation cases, including those made at the recommendation of the court."

"In cases where the spouse or children of a person liable to deportation are British citizens, there would also be the option for them to accompany the deported person at public expense."

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DO you agree with the deportation, or had he served his time and be allowed to remain in the UK?

Write to Your Letters, The Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail: EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk>

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