Social workers need support

WHO would be a social worker?Today's announcement that Suffolk County Council is to invest in its services for children and young people is especially welcome in the wake of the Baby P case and the tragic events surrounding the death of Luigi Askew in Ipswich back in 2007.

WHO would be a social worker?

Today's announcement that Suffolk County Council is to invest in its services for children and young people is especially welcome in the wake of the Baby P case and the tragic events surrounding the death of Luigi Askew in Ipswich back in 2007.

Social workers have to deal with some of the most difficult cases anyone can imagine - it is a job fraught with difficulties and a job where a wrong decision can have a fatal outcome.

Social workers can face criticism if they are too quick to take a child into care - or if they leave a child with its family and it comes to harm then they will face the wrath of the world.


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What they do need is the support of a professional organisation and enough colleagues to ensure that their workload is not too great - that they don't have so much to do that important issues fall through the agenda.

That is why today's investment in their work is so vital. The death of Luigi Askew was not caused by social workers - it was caused by his violent father.

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But there have been occasions when the county's caring services could have done better and today's investment should make it easier for them to do their work in the months and years ahead.

It is not just a county council issue - it is an issue for the whole community.

Nothing is ever going to make social work an attractive job for most people, but those dedicated professionals who do want to make a difference for children with some of the most difficult problems in society deserve all the help and support they can get.

MUCH-loved pet Dween didn't stand a chance when she was set upon by a pack of dogs in her own garden in an incident that shows that hunts need to take much more care when they go out to enjoy their hobby.

Since hunting with dogs was banned it has been illegal to use hounds to kill animals - they have to chase a scent laid down before taking part in their “sport.”

What yesterday's sad incident shows is that hunt organisers need to take much more care about how their hounds behave. Dogs are pack animals, and it is well-known that once they get the sniff of a kill they will do what they want.

After yesterday's incident there needs to be a full independent inquiry by the police and the RSPCA to establish what controls were in place and why they did not work.

It is not acceptable for the hunt to just express sorrow for the death - firm action needs to be taken to ensure there is no repeat of this incident. And householders who live in the are used by hunts need to know that their pets are safe.

Pets face enough danger on the roads without also facing the risk of being mauled by a pack of savage dogs.

AFTER few anxious moments for Chelsea, Town fans now know they will be heading to Stamford Bridge for a plum FA Cup fourth round tie later this month.

It will be a welcome distraction from a mediocre league season - and with Chelsea's home form being so patchy Town boss Jim Magilton will be fancying his chances.

Let's hope he spends the next ten days practicing set-pieces from corners and free-kicks that Chelsea seem so vulnerable to at the moment.

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