Son behind bars for violent attack

A VIOLENT son is today beginning a jail term after beating his 71-year-old Ipswich mother “black and blue” because she burned his dinner.Terrified Irene Thorpe, who was left partially disabled after a stroke, told police how her son had flipped after she burned the mince.

A VIOLENT son is today beginning a jail term after beating his 71-year-old Ipswich mother “black and blue” after she burned his dinner.

Irene Thorpe, who is left partially disabled after a stroke, told police how her son had flipped after she burned the mince. She said 39-year-old Christopher Thorpe used her “like a punchbag”.

Rupert Overbury, prosecuting at Ipswich Crown Court, said: “He threw her to the floor and, in her words, 'went wild'. She said all her injuries were caused by him punching her.”

Mrs Thorpe suffered extensive bruising to her face, head, arm, thighs and hands. Thorpe pleaded guilty to causing his mother grievous bodily harm between April 23 and 25.

The court heard Mrs Thorpe was also attacked by her son in 1995 and 2002, for which he was jailed for 16 weeks and 30 months respectively.

Thorpe, who has never had a job, lived with his mother at their Pembroke Close home, where he mainly stayed in his bedroom.

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While being treated at Ipswich Hospital, Mrs Thorpe told the nurse her son had shouted at her and attacked her for burning the mince.

When Thorpe was arrested he had taken an overdose. He initially denied hurting his mother but later admitted it and said: “If I don't get help soon, I will end up hurting someone really badly.”

Richard Atchley, mitigating, said his client had received a letter from his mother since he had been in custody, telling him that she loved him. Mr Atchley said Thorpe also loved his mother.

Judge John Holt said: “You beat up your mother, having lost your temper. The photos show she was beaten black and blue. She is terrified of you and certain you will do it again.”

He jailed Thorpe for three and a half years but extended his licence on release to the maximum of 18 months.

He said he hoped Thorpe would receive specialist help while he was in prison.

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