Special barriers could block A14 noise

LONG-suffering families plagued by noise and fumes from heavy lorries were told today that acoustic barriers could be put in place alongside the A14.Residents in the twin Trimley villages have for years had to put up with the sound of pounding trucks on the dual carriageway just yards from their homes.

LONG-suffering families plagued by noise and fumes from heavy lorries were told today that acoustic barriers could be put in place alongside the A14.

Residents in the twin Trimley villages have for years had to put up with the sound of pounding trucks on the dual carriageway just yards from their homes.

They complain that the noise and fumes is so bad that in summer they have to keep their windows shut and cannot use their gardens.

With Felixstowe port set to double its capacity in the next 15 years, the situation will get much worse with an extra one million lorries passing by.

But now, following talks between parish councillors and port chiefs, special measures could be taken to cut the noise and improve life for the people living on the Farmlands estate at Trimley St Mary.

Parish council chairman Richard Kerry said a feasibility study was being carried out and there was a "good possibility" that acoustic barriers will be built.

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These would probably take the form of wide earth embankments alongside the open space between the estate and A14, designed and shaped to absorb and block the noise from the road.

They could be grassed or planted with shrubs and it is hoped that planting already done to try to block some of the noise could be retained.

Mr Kerry said: "The talks with the port have so far gone very well and we are continuing our push for acoustic barriers because noise is a huge problem for people living on the estate next to the road.

"There is now a good possibility that acoustic barriers to deaden the noise from the A14 will be included in the plan for the port development."

Suffolk Coastal council is also pressing for acoustic barriers and has set up a series of workshops with port executives to discuss a number of issues ahead of the public inquiry into the redevelopment of Landguard Terminal.

It is hoped to come to agreement on most of the points of conflict - where the port will be asked to take action - before the inquiry begins on October 26.

Other areas being discussed include pollution, traffic safety, TV interference, visual intrusion, and community facilities such as a new port viewing area, visitor centre and jetty for the cross-harbour ferry.

The port wants to convert Landguard Terminal into a deepwater terminal able to handle the world's largest container ships.

It will also feature a new rail terminal, back-up storage land, and an extra 1,350 metres of quay, doubling the port's capacity.

n What do you think? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

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