Stephen swaps speed for sequins

FOR years, he devoted himself to the testosterone-fuelled, highly-charged world of motocross racing.But now teenager Stephen Daw has swapped the dirt and adrenaline for sequins and more sedate glamour after falling in love with ballroom dancing.

FOR years, he devoted himself to the testosterone-fuelled, highly-charged world of motocross racing.

But now teenager Stephen Daw has swapped the dirt and adrenaline for sequins and more sedate glamour after falling in love with ballroom dancing.

The 19-year-old is now hoping to wow judges at the Blackpool Tower ballroom when he competes with his girlfriend, Leila Silva, just a year after he was racing motorbikes.

Daw, who lives in Newton Green, near Sudbury, said that he became unexpectedly hooked with dancing after watching hit BBC show Strictly Come Dancing.

“I watched the programme once on a Saturday night and straightaway thought that I would love to dance like that,” he admitted.

“I arranged some lessons and apparently, I'm quite good, or so I have been told.

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“I was okay at motocross, though nothing special. I like the competitive side of dancing and the best feeling is when your number is called out and the judges have voted for you.”

Daw and his 17-year-old girlfriend only started lessons at Ipswich's Lait Dance Club in January.

But they have already qualified for the Blackpool, where Daw will dance the jive with teacher Sally Copple and the cha-cha-cha with his girlfriend.

Although still a member of the East Anglian Schoolboy Scrambling Club, Daw said he would not be returning to motocross for fear that injury would deprive him a place on the dance floor.

He said: “It is normally the girl that begs the boy to start dancing, but it was the other way round with us.

“Some of my friends have understood completely, while others have made a joke about it, although in good spirits. To be honest, I can't believe how much I have enjoyed it. I just love the thrill of competing.”

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