Thunderstorms

Thunderstorms

max temp: 18°C

min temp: 8°C

Search

Steps taken to open new walking spot

PUBLISHED: 15:47 31 July 2001 | UPDATED: 15:16 03 March 2010

HOPES are high that a long-awaited new walk will be opened to allow people to stroll around a beauty spot at Suffolk's southernmost point.

For years access has been banned around Landguard Point at Felixstowe - frustrating walkers who enjoy reaching the most unusual places.

HOPES are high that a long-awaited new walk will be opened to allow people to stroll around a beauty spot at Suffolk's southernmost point.

For years access has been banned around Landguard Point at Felixstowe – frustrating walkers who enjoy reaching the most unusual places.

Walkers have faced high wire fencing to stop them going any further on the beach and then face quite a long walk inland and back to the sea to get round.

The problems have been caused because part of the peninsula next to the port was used as an aggregates site – now disused – and part of the area is protected because of nesting birds and rare plants.

But now a project is set to get under way to see if these difficulties can be overcome to allow unrestricted access right around the point from the Port Viewing Area to the 62-acre nature reserve.

Felixstowe Town Council is to take on the scheme on behalf of the Landguard Forum, a body comprising representatives of all the organisations interested in the 114-acre Landguard peninsula.

Town clerk Susan Robinson said: "Some preliminary work has been done but there is still quite a lot of work involved.

"We need to ascertain what finance is available for the scheme, sort out signage for the walk, and get one of two health and safety hazards removed.

"It is quite likely to be a reasonably costly project, though there is no suggestion that the town council will pay for it in its entirety, though we may consider whether to make a contribution as part of a partnership project."

It will be a great boost for the users of Landguard, which attracts 675,000 visitors a year.

The scheme is included in the management plan for the area, which aims to set up a visitor centre and create a themed transport link among its projects.

Tourism chiefs and wildlife wardens face a dilemma because they want people to enjoy the peninsula but fear the huge number of people wanting to use the area is threatening to damage it and erode its special nature and attractiveness.

The area is home to more than 375 species of plants, including one third of all British grasses, and the rare stinking goosefoot. The shingle spit is also a site for migrating birds.

Its nature reserve is a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and the area also has a bird observatory, Landguard Fort and its 16 acre grounds, Felixstowe Museum and the port viewing area.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists