Stolen goods businessman jailed

AN IPSWICH man who ran a small business advertised as a "discreet and friendly service" has been jailed for receiving stolen goods.Ipswich Crown Court heard that Mark Bond, also known as Dowling, ran a buying and selling business which involved buying goods and selling them on the internet.

AN IPSWICH man who ran a small business advertised as a "discreet and friendly service" has been jailed for receiving stolen goods.

Ipswich Crown Court heard that Mark Bond, also known as Dowling, ran a buying and selling business which involved buying goods and selling them on the internet.

However, some of the items, about £4,000 of car hi-fi equipment, had been stolen from cars parked locally.

Bond, 35, of Fore Street, pleaded guilty to eight counts of dishonestly receiving stolen goods and asked for a stolen laptop to be taken into consideration when he appeared at court on Friday.


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Bond was sent to prison for six months.

The court heard that when police searched Bond's home, he revealed a concealed cupboard under his bed containing the stolen items.

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Bond, who has a previous criminal record for dishonesty, told police he had been running a legitimate business but had lapsed into his "bad old ways" when his girlfriend Tracey Steggalls became pregnant and pressures became too great for him.

He named three youths who had been supplying him with stolen car stereos for about six weeks, but he would not name another man who supplied many of the other items seized by police.

The court heard that Bond had advertised in local shop windows that he would buy unwanted items through his "discreet and friendly service" and included his mobile and home telephone numbers.

Lindsay Cox prosecuting said: "He lapsed into his bad old ways and is ashamed of what he did."

Judge John Devaux said: "You pleaded not guilty but not at the first opportunity and although the value of the property was not huge, you pleaded guilty to a number of counts.

"It is disturbing that three local youths were giving you items and you were someone who bought the items no questions asked and would not reveal one of your sources. You have plenty of experience in criminal matters and it is impossible to believe you thought you were buying items legitimately."

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