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Sue Ryder to deliver Dementia Together in Suffolk to help people stay independent for longer

PUBLISHED: 11:02 04 March 2017

John Hague, pictured at a conference at Trinity Park, says the new service will make it  easier for people to get the right help. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

John Hague, pictured at a conference at Trinity Park, says the new service will make it easier for people to get the right help. Picture: SARAH LUCY BROWN

A specialist new service is launching next month to help people living with dementia in Suffolk.

Sue Ryder has already delievered dementia services, such as the Synergy Cafe, pictured here in Ipswich. Picture: LUCY TAYLORSue Ryder has already delievered dementia services, such as the Synergy Cafe, pictured here in Ipswich. Picture: LUCY TAYLOR

Dementia Together aims to breakdown organisational boundaries so people can access joined up support to help them live independently for longer.

Ipswich and East Suffolk and West Suffolk clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), in partnership with Suffolk County Council, have commissioned Sue Ryder and three partner organisations to deliver the new-look service from April 1.

It will be available to people at all stages of the illness, as well as their families or carers, offering a single point of contact to make it easier to access the right help at the right time and avoid crises. This includes information, help from a trained advisor, a community-based support group, or an expert. The new service will also work to raise people’s awareness of the signs of dementia.

Sue Ryder will deliver the service in partnership with Norfolk and Suffolk Dementia Alliance, the University of Suffolk and Purple Tuesday.

Jo Marshall, Sue Ryder Neurological Centre director said: “We are very excited to be working together with such a range of organisations – what unites us is a shared passion to make a positive difference to the lives of people who are affected by dementia including family carers.

“We hope our joined up approach will mean people will not have to keep retelling their story and lead us to deliver a high quality service.”

John Hague, GP and governing body member of Ipswich and East Suffolk CCG said: “This new service will bring a huge amount of information about the services and support which are available to people affected by dementia into one place, in turn making it easier for people to get the right help to meet their needs.”

He said many patients told doctors they felt “overwhelmed by the range of help which is available”, which this service sought to address.

“We hope that by empowering patients and their families and giving them the right information and support, we can help them live well with dementia and stay independent for longer,” Dr Hague added.

Suffolk County Council’s Cabinet Member for Adult Care, Beccy Hopfensperger said: “This type of partnership working and service development is all about finding a new way to do things that brings together providers from across the county to share expertise and deliver the services that residents are asking for.”

The service will replace the existing post-diagnostic dementia support, which is due to end on March 31.

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