Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 18°C

min temp: 12°C

Search

Suffolk honours its fallen heroes

PUBLISHED: 12:44 12 November 2001 | UPDATED: 10:49 03 March 2010

IN quiet contemplation, hundreds of people gathered to remember those who lost their lives fighting for their country in war.

Young and old stood side by side surrounding Ipswich Cenotaph in Christchurch Park to join the nation in paying their respects to those who died in battle during the World Wars and the conflicts that have followed since.

IN quiet contemplation, hundreds of people gathered to remember those who lost their lives fighting for their country in war.

Young and old stood side by side surrounding Ipswich Cenotaph in Christchurch Park to join the nation in paying their respects to those who died in battle during the World Wars and the conflicts that have followed since.

A procession of veterans and dignitaries made its way across the park, from the mansion to the memorial, to take their positions in front of lines of cadets from all areas of the forces.

The last post echoed around the park, and at 11am the town fell quiet and heads were bowed for two minutes silence.

Only the occasional child's cry, dog barking or duck quacking could be heard in the distance as people took time to remember and reflect.

Prayers, readings and hymns followed in the Remembrance Sunday service before representatives of the town and armed forces laid wreaths at the foot of the cenotaph.

It was a time not only to honour the debt owed to the men and women who sacrificed their lives for Britain but to pray for those currently involved in conflict.

Canon Wells, conducting the service, offered prayers to the victims of the terrorist attacks on September 11 and all those currently involved in the fighting in Afghanistan.

Later in the day it was a time for children to offer their respects to the generation of their grandparents and great grandparents.

Though many were too young to understand the poignancy of the occasion, they stood alongside those who are old enough to remember the experience of war, to lay poppies at the foot of the war graves in the Fields of Honour in Ipswich Cemetery.

Again the Last Post sounded out and two minutes of silence provided a chance to quietly reflect on the significance of the day.

The ceremony was echoed by another at Felixstowe, where poppy-wearers gathered on the seafront to hear the Last Post.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists