Suffolk injury toll is unclear

IT IS still unclear today whether Suffolk has avoided suffering any deaths or serious casualties in the terrorist attacks on London.Suffolk Police would be asked to contact the next of kin of any casualties in yesterday's attack on the transport network of the capital.

IT IS still unclear today whether Suffolk has avoided suffering any deaths or serious casualties in the terrorist attacks on London.

Suffolk Police would be asked to contact the next of kin of any casualties in yesterday's attack on the transport network of the capital.

But at a briefing today officers were told that no one from the county had been identified among the dead or injured.

However the death toll is still rising and a police spokeswoman said it was possible that some of the victims had not yet been identified and that some could still be found to come from Suffolk.


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She said: "It is too early to say we have avoided any casualties – that is all a matter of time."

Councils would also be involved in dealing with families, and yesterday afternoon local authorities in East Anglia were warned that their residents could have been involved in the tragedy.

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At that time the situation was unclear and police believed there could have been seven bombs. Eventually it became apparent that four devices had gone off.

By today councils had heard nothing from officials in London and they were hopeful that no one from this area had been involved.

An Ipswich council official said: "If there had been anyone from here involved in the tragedy I'm sure we would have been told by now."

One of the bombs was on the Circle Line between Aldgate and Liverpool Street.

However it was on a train heading towards the mainline station –bringing workers from other parts of the capital to the financial district rather than taking travellers from East Anglia to other parts of London.

The worst death toll came on a tube train heading north on the Picadilly Line between Russell Square and Kings Cross.

At least 21 people died on this train – but it is unlikely anyone from East Anglia would have been on it at 9am, as the train was travelling from south London.

The one train where there could have been East Anglian passengers on board was the Circle Line route heading from Edgware Road towards Paddington.

Anyone heading from this region to the south west or south Wales by train would be likely to use that route.

The bus bomb at Tavistock Square was on a normal service bus – not a tourist route as first reported.

Buses tend to be used mainly by London residents who understand the routes better than visitors who tend to stick to the tube with its simple maps.

n. Do you know of anyone involved in the tragedy? Call the Evening Star newsdesk on 01473 324788

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