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Take away the idea of a takeaway please

PUBLISHED: 00:55 30 May 2002 | UPDATED: 12:01 03 March 2010

RESIDENTS of an Ipswich estate fear their peace and quiet could be shattered by a new late-night takeaway.

Councillors on the borough council's planning committee agreed a classification change for a baker's shop in Penshurst Road at Broke Hall, meaning a takeaway or restaurant could take its place.

RESIDENTS of an Ipswich estate fear their peace and quiet could be shattered by a new late-night takeaway.

Councillors on the borough council's planning committee agreed a classification change for a baker's shop in Penshurst Road at Broke Hall, meaning a takeaway or restaurant could take its place.

Susan Thorpe, 49, of Wareham Avenue, said Broke Hall residents were furious after councillors ignored 118 letters of objection and a 600-name petition opposing any change of use for the old Bowman's Bakery shop.

She said: "To ignore those objections was immoral. Why can't the council be proud of estates that feel good about their community?

"We don't need our children being encouraged to stray. We have virtually zero crime and no vandalism to speak of.

"The council said opening hours would be capped to 11.30pm, but it will still attract after-pub business and we don't want it."

Mrs Thorpe said she was worried a new takeaway would lead to more litter and late-night noise from post-pub revellers.

But Broke Hall residents haven't given up the fight over the shop's future. Arthur Tydeman, who organised the petition, said he planned to make a formal complaint to the local government Ombudsman.

Mr Tydeman, of Penshurst Road, said: "I went to the hearing, but I didn't believe it had any chance of going through.

"It was disgraceful – we've just been steamrollered. I believe to get 118 letters of objection is an unprecedented response."

A council spokesman confirmed there had been a significant response to the application.

But she said planning applications were decided not on the weight of response, but the issues raised.

She said: "We had a large number of complaints, but they were not on significant planning grounds.

"It's not based on the weight of complaints, but on the content.

"They have to be valid planning reasons which have to be substantiated."


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