Tearaways cause problems across Britain

IPSWICH tearaways are being matched in their bad behaviour by yobs round the country, it emerged today.Four of the town's most notorious teenage troublemakers have been hauled before the courts for breaking their Anti-Social Behaviour orders.

IPSWICH tearaways are being matched in their bad behaviour by yobs round the country, it emerged today.

Four of the town's most notorious teenage troublemakers have been hauled before the courts for breaking their Anti-Social Behaviour orders.

And now it has emerged that the supposedly tough laws are being ignored by other louts across the nation.

Gainsborough trio Thomas Crowley, Jason Nicholls and David Dixon have all been found guilty of breaching their orders.


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Last week Whitton teenager Tiran Gull joined them in the hall of shame.

But new figures show they are far from exceptional in the troubled world of youth crime.

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Home Office minister Hazel Blears has admitted more than four in ten Asbos imposed on young offenders have been breached.

Overall figures, including statistics for adults, show nearly a third of the orders have been ignored.

But Ms Blears claimed the orders were working because more than half of them have held firm since being introduced by the courts.

The shocking figures are to be backed up by a BBC documentary on Wednesday.

Journalist Peter Kenyon followed Asbo youths after they had been dealt with by the courts and discovered offending behaviour often continued.

A survey for the programme Kenyon Confronts claims 370 out of 842 young people (44%) given an Asbo ignored the bans.

Home Office minister Hazel Blears states on the show, due to be screened on Wednesday, that between 28% and 29% of people, including adults, have breached their orders.

The initiative introduced in April 1999 contains conditions prohibiting the offender from specific anti-social acts or entering defined areas, and are in force for a minimum of two years.

Up to June this year 1,337 have been imposed by the courts.

To compile the survey, programme makers contacted every local authority in England and Wales.

Paul Woolwich, the programme's executive producer, said: "The frightening thing is that the 370 represents only breaches that are known about - the figures could be even higher."

In an interview for the programme, Ms Blears says about the survey: "Well I think that tells me that over half of them have not been breached. That means the behaviour has stopped, so in over half the cases anti-social behaviour is no longer, I hope, a problem for those communities."

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