The building no one wanted

LANDMARK House on the edge of Ipswich has been mired in controversy ever since it first took shape in the late 1990s.Residents of Bramford did not like the way it dominated their skyline - and insult was added to injury when its owner Agilent pulled out even before the building was occupied.

LANDMARK House on the edge of Ipswich has been mired in controversy ever since it first took shape in the late 1990s.

Residents of Bramford did not like the way it dominated their skyline - and insult was added to injury when its owner Agilent pulled out even before the building was occupied.

It has been the biggest white elephant in Ipswich since the day it was completed.

Planning rules say that councillors considering development applications are not able to take economic factors into account.

Which has meant we now have the situation where the building's owners are so desperate to find a tenant that they have offered a new Aston Martin car to any sales executive who can close the deal.

This news will inevitable provoke anger in Bramford - a building that no one wanted in the first place is a building that no one wants to occupy!

Most Read

Many people will feel that this merely indicates what they had felt at the start - that this building should never have been approved in the first place.

Of course no one knew when the plans were first submitted or work on the ground started that Agilent would decide to pull out of Ipswich before it was completed.

It is a salutary reminder that while the town may welcome the attention of multi-national companies, their presence here can be a double-edged sword.

And when a firm with no firm roots in the community decides to up-sticks and leave town, they can leave behind a legacy that can take years to resolve.

HIGH street stores like Woolworths are not always seen as obvious targets for armed raids - but in the run-up to Christmas they can hold considerable amounts of valuable stock . . . and cash.

The raid at Felixstowe just eight days before Christmas sent shockwaves through traders in the town, and now it seems as if the attack could be linked with a similar incident at Bishop's Stortford a week later.

These raids are a salutary reminder to everyone of the dangers faced by shop staff - and of the need to tackle this kind of crime.

With good transport links raiders can be in and out of a town like Felixstowe within minutes. By the time the police are able to get to the scene they could be over the Orwell Bridge and speeding along the A14 or A12.

Police dealing with serious crimes like this need to be able to co-ordinate their investigation with colleagues from other forces to ensure that the hunt for the criminals is not handicapped by county boundaries any more than their escape was along the trunk roads of East Anglia.

FOR years there has been speculation that there is something dangerous lurking in the dense woods and forests of East Anglia - a big cat nicknamed Claws.

Now there are suggestions that the sea around the region has become the latest home to the world's most terrifying marine killer . . . the great white shark.

Half-eaten bodies of seals and porpoises have been washed up on beaches from North Norfolk to Aldeburgh.

Experts say there is no reason why a great white should not swim into the North Sea - but are doubtful about the “evidence” so far presented.

Whatever the truth, the latest speculation gives swimmers the perfect excuse to avoid winter dips in the sea - and confine their activities to the warmth and comfort of the county's swimming pools.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter