Search

Toddler's dramatic rescue

PUBLISHED: 17:58 25 April 2003 | UPDATED: 13:46 03 March 2010

LITTLE Donnie Murrell had gone blue when his parents dragged him from a garden pond.

Now the 16-month-old toddler is back to his mischievous ways after making a miraculous recovery.

LITTLE Donnie Murrell had gone blue when his parents dragged him from a garden pond.

Now the 16-month-old toddler is back to his mischievous ways after making a miraculous recovery.

Today his Suffolk grandparents relieved their horror of the frantic minutes in which Donnie's dad Graham fought to keep his son alive.

"We all thought he was dead," said grandmother Doreen Gamblin.

"He was blue in the face, he'd stopped breathing and he must have been in the pond for about six minutes.

"His mum Clare was screaming at Graham to leave him because he was already dead."

But the heroic dad gave mouth to mouth and chest massage to his stricken toddler son for nearly eight minutes until the ambulance crew arrived at the home in Bramble Way, Lavenheath, near Sudbury.

The near-tragic events had shattered a quiet family reunion for Mothers Day.

Miss Gamblin said: "I'll never forget how Stephen the ambulance man grabbed Donnie from Graham's arms and just ran off with him.

"Graham fell through the patio doors and collapsed on the floor in tears.

"But he had to drag himself up to go off with them."

Today the ambulance crew of Gabrielle Morris and Stephen Willis were set to be reunited with the whole family to celebrate Donnie's recovery.

And yet the Gamblins still cannot believe their toddler grandson managed to find his way into a pond that is normally covered.

Mrs Gamblin said: "There were four adults and just one child – how could it happen?

"We all thought he was with the others and I can't say 100 per cent the patio doors were just.

"Somehow he managed to find his way out."

In paying tribute to Graham, Mr Gamblin said: "It goes to show that you should never ever stop.

"Just keep on going until the ambulance arrives. That's what they will always tell you to do on a CPR course."

Mr and Mrs Gamblin paid tribute to the paramedics and hospital staff in both Colchester and London who helped save their grandson.

Mrs Gamblin said: "The NHS really kicked in. When something like this happens it's a real eye opener.

"At first they said he might be brain damaged but we are just so happy and relieved he is ok."


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Ipswich Star. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Ipswich Star