Too many too fast

A POLICE chief inspector today spoke of his disappointment after nearly 400 motorists were handed speeding tickets on Suffolk's A14 since July.Alan Pawsey, announcing the results of a three-month crackdown, also warned speeders that cameras are not the only method being used to prosecute them.

A POLICE chief inspector today spoke of his disappointment after nearly 400 motorists were handed speeding tickets on Suffolk's A14 since July.

Alan Pawsey, announcing the results of a three-month crackdown, also warned speeders that cameras are not the only method being used to prosecute them.

Digital devices measuring the speed of vehicles over set distances have been used throughout this latest campaign, launched to cut accidents and help keep the vital route running smoothly.

Ch insp Pawsey, of Suffolk police's roads traffic unit, said: “I'm very disappointed these numbers of people are breaking the speed laws, particularly considering the history of the road and the problems that are caused when it is closed.

“This shows we're committed to road safety on the A14 and we're trying to take action to prevent accidents. Eventually people will get the message.

“With the current focus on the A14, we thought it would be a good idea to look at the things that cause accidents.

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“Although not all crashes are due to speed, we know we have a problem with the number of speeding vehicles.”

Police have pledged to continue targeting speeders along the entire stretch of the A14 in a bid to make drivers slow down.

The “time and distance” equipment used in this latest backlash, known as a police pilot, is embedded in the dashboards of the vehicles.

It can be operated from the side of the road to calculate the speed of oncoming vehicles between two set points or when in a pursuit, meaning officers do not need to use a speed gun.

Ch insp Pawsey said these tactics have been used over a long period of time and have proved effective in penalising drivers who simply slow down for speed cameras and then accelerate away.

He said: “If people see an open road some are going to be tempted to accelerate but that can cause problems and what we do know is excess speed is a major factor in fatal or serious collisions.

“We all know what happens to Ipswich and the surrounding area when the A14 is closed and for that reason it is important we improve safety.”

In July 152 people were handed fixed penalty tickets, 106 in August and 129 in September. Each motorist was caught exceeding the 70mph speed limit, although one was clocked at 66mph in the 50mph zone at the Haughley bends in August.

The fines generated from these tickets top £23,000.

The figures released by Suffolk police do not include motorists who have received court summons in relation to their speeding.

Five people are due to appear before magistrates in Ipswich next week accused of travelling at more than 100mph on the road.

What do you think should be done to improve safety on the A14? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or e-mail eveningstarletters@eveningstar.co.uk

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