Train bosses deny drug link

BOSSES at Ipswich-based Anglia Railways today denied that their latest marketing campaign for services to Amsterdam encouraged drug-taking.Their denial came on the day that new reports suggested cannabis use among teenagers could lead to mental problems.

BOSSES at Ipswich-based Anglia Railways today denied that their latest marketing campaign for services to Amsterdam encouraged drug-taking.

Their denial came on the day that new reports suggested cannabis use among teenagers could lead to mental problems.

Anglia was accused of cashing in on cannabis culture by urging youngsters to "roll up, roll up" for a bargain break to Amsterdam.

The advertisement appears in Norwich-based youth magazine Outline, which has the cover story "Has the whole world gone to pot?"


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The same November edition takes cannabis growing and smoking as its theme.

Maureen Griffiths, who believes cannabis drove her teenage son Shaun to suicide, was furious at the Anglia Railways' advert, which reads "Roll Up, Roll Up – Amsterdam just £25. Dam that's good".

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She believed the phrase "roll up" used in the advert tapped into the language of drug-users who "roll up" marijuana joints.

"I believe it sends young people the wrong message, that it's okay to go on a weekend break to smoke cannabis," said Mrs Griffiths, who lives in Bury St Edmunds with her husband John.

"It was not our intention to condone drugs use, that is not the message of these leaflets at all," said Anglia Railways' communications manager Peter Meades.

"They are a light-hearted leaflet aimed at young people – which is the main market for these trips to Amsterdam."

Mr Meades said the campaign had been running since mid summer with no objections – and they were booked in the magazine some months ago before the company knew what the editorial content would be.

Todays reports, from Australia, New Zealand and Sweden, all conclude that the authorities should introduce strategies to reduce cannabis use - particularly among minors.

In one study of 1,601 students from 44 secondary schools in Australia, frequent cannabis use appeared to result in a rise in later depression and anxiety in girls.

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