Train tragedy was suicide

A TRAIN driver thought he saw a carrier bag on the tracks before he realised it was a man in a white top running towards him, an inquest has heard.Nigel Fitch, of Downside Close, Ipswich, ran in front of the on-coming train as it travelled from London's Liverpool Street to Ipswich.

A TRAIN driver thought he saw a carrier bag on the tracks before he realised it was a man in a white top running towards him, an inquest has heard.

Nigel Fitch, of Downside Close, Ipswich, ran in front of the on-coming train as it travelled from London's Liverpool Street to Ipswich.

Police officers later revealed he had left a suicide note at his home explaining he had been upset due to relationship problems he was having with his wife, Karen Fitch.

In the inquest, held at Endeavour House, Ipswich, family members heard the incident happened at around 11.40pm, on June 20 at Bobbits Lane, in Ipswich.

Greater Suffolk and East Essex Coroner Dr Peter Dean read out a statement from train driver, Mark Rowe.

It said: “I had just passed a Colchester bound train when I saw something coming out from under the bridge.

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“I thought at first it was a carrier bag and then realised it was a person in a white top.

“The person seemed to run towards me and then stopped.

“I immediately applied the emergency brakes but could not do anything else and so turned away.

“It was then that the train hit him.”

The inquest heard the train had been travelling at 85mph when the brakes were applied.

Soon after the collision police and paramedics were called to the scene and Mr Fitch, 43, was pronounced dead at 12.35am on June 21.

He had died of multiple injuries.

The body was identified after British Transport Police took fingerprints from the scene and traced them back to Mr Fitch.

A later inspection of the train found it was in good working order and neither the brakes or speedometer were broken.

A verdict of suicide was recorded.

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