Search

Tributes after death of composer

PUBLISHED: 01:40 09 December 2004 | UPDATED: 05:27 02 March 2010

TRIBUTES have been paid to one of East Anglia's leading and most prolific composers, who has died at the age of 88.

Jack Hawes was known both regionally and nationally for his work, which was performed by choirs and orchestras at cathedrals, schools, churches and concert halls around the country, and also abroad.

TRIBUTES have been paid to one of East Anglia's leading and most prolific composers, who has died at the age of 88.

Jack Hawes was known both regionally and nationally for his work, which was performed by choirs and orchestras at cathedrals, schools, churches and concert halls around the country, and also abroad.

His music was regularly featured on radio and recorded on albums.

A cellist and pianist, he was a member of Ipswich Orchestral Society and the Trianon Music Group for nearly 30 years.

Chris Green, of Trianon, said Mr Hawes was "an accomplished musician" who enjoyed both playing and composing.

He had written specifically for particular groups and occasions and his work had been performed widely.

"He wrote very sympathetically for players because he himself was a player and knew what they could do and his music would fit their abilities. He was always very encouraging, especially to younger musicians, which was a very endearing characteristic of Jack's," he said.

Mr Hawes showed musical ability from an early age and at the age of ten became a chorister at Ipswich's St Mary-le-Tower Church, where his funeral will be held on Friday December 17 at 2.30pm.

It was at the church that Jack studied the organ and he began composing when he was 14. He was educated at St John's Primary and Northgate Grammar.

On leaving school, he worked in the insurance industry, a long way from the imaginative and romantic life of a composer.

Then in 1939, war broke out and he volunteered for the army, spending time in the Middle East, Western Desert, Libya, Palestine and Lebanon. Later he was selected for the army's Special Operations to do under-cover work in Italy.

After the war, he became involved in local musical societies and joined Trianon as the accompanist for the singers and also joined its orchestra.

At 55, Mr Hawes, who lived in Lynwood Avenue, Felixstowe, found his musical work taking up more and more of his life and so took early retirement to concentrate full-time on his work as a composer.

He wrote for choirs, orchestras, piano, organ, brass and woodwind, and said his aim was always to write music which was useful in the community, church and concert hall, and spoke of the thrill at hearing his music sung or played.

He attributed his influences to 20th century English music, Walton, Bliss and John Ireland, and some French - Delius and Debussy. Most of his published work was church or religious music.

Away from music, he enjoyed reading, gardening and swimming.

See also Arts Scene, page 12.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Ipswich Star