Tributes paid to courageous Barry

TRIBUTES have today been paid to a "determined and courageous" Ipswich man who raised thousands of pounds for charity after being diagnosed with cancer.

TRIBUTES have today been paid to a "determined and courageous" Ipswich man who raised thousands of pounds for charity after being diagnosed with cancer.

Barry Andrews, from Nacton Road, died last month, aged 61, after a five-year battle with bowel cancer.

After being diagnosed with the cancer in 2000, Mr Andrews dedicated himself to a life of fundraising, significantly boosting the coffers of a number of charities and worthy causes.

His two daughters, Tracy and Susan Andrews, said their father's efforts to raise funds for the likes of Ipswich hospital, Colchester Hospital and St Elizabeth Hospice had been an inspiration to them.

Tracy, 31, said: "He had such determination and tremendous courage. He was frightened of his illness but he always said what will be, will be.

"He'd do anything for anyone. He was more interested in helping other people rather than worrying about himself.

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"He raised an awful lot of money for so many good causes and he was always taking part in some charity event or other. If he were still alive today, he would have been doing charity work and helping people out."

An Ipswich Town fan through and through, Barry's proudest charity drive was a sponsored bike ride in aid of Bobby Robson's Jubilee Appeal, which raised £7,500.

Because of the embarrassment factor often connected with bowel cancer, his daughters said Barry always spoke of his determination that people should confront the illness.

Susan, 35, said: "People do get embarrassed over it all, but he would always say you might have a few days of embarrassment, but you are a long time dead."

Tracy said that more than 200 people attended his funeral. Mr Andrews died on March 20.

She added: "They were spilling out of the church. So many people came up to us and said what a lovely man he was.

"When he was diagnosed, the doctors told him he wouldn't be able to do anything but he proved them wrong.

"This time last year he was building a shed and he was sorting out my back garden when he had chemotherapy.

"He didn't like it when people told him he needed to take it easy. He wanted to prove people wrong - he wanted to prove life doesn't stop when you get cancer."

n. What are your memories of Mr Andrews? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN or email eveningstarletters.co.uk

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