University Campus Suffolk launches ‘Innovation Hub’ with Intel and Fujitsu to boost STEM subjects - science, technology, engineering and maths

Simon Worsfield of Fujitsu cuts the ribbon with Richard Lister, provost and chief executive of UCS a

Simon Worsfield of Fujitsu cuts the ribbon with Richard Lister, provost and chief executive of UCS at the launch of the Innovation Hub with Henley Primary School pupils. - Credit: Archant

University Campus Suffolk and leading technology businesses have teamed up to launch a state-of-the-art education centre focusing on improving maths, science and engineering skills.

Ben Gummer MP tries the technology at the launch of the Innovation Hub at UCS.

Ben Gummer MP tries the technology at the launch of the Innovation Hub at UCS. - Credit: Archant

The Fujitsu and Intel “Innovation Hub”, which is designed to boost skills in areas like computer games design and diagnostic radiography, was unveiled at the university (UCS) in Ipswich earlier today.

Learners of all ages – from primary school, mature students and members of the community – will have access to the centre, which is the first of several to be opened in universities or higher education institutions in the country.

Mohamed Abdel-Maguid, head of science and technology at the university, said: “We must address the skills shortage, and here at this university we agree that we must supply talented, high quality students. With working in partnership with Fujitsu and Intel on the innovation hub it will help students access the next technological advances.”

Year 6 pupils from Henley Primary School were the first students to use the new equipment which is based in the James Hehir Building.

Mohammed Abdel-Maguid, head of science and technology at UCS, speaks at the launch of the Innovation

Mohammed Abdel-Maguid, head of science and technology at UCS, speaks at the launch of the Innovation Hub - Credit: Archant

The technology which attracted the most interest was the Oculus Rift 3D goggles. These are for computer games design students to use when creating virtual realities. Another high-tech tool is 3D software to help radiography students.

Ash Merchant, head of education for Fujitsu, said it was a “momentous” day for UCS and the companies. “It’s a wonderful day seeing children using the technology, capturing hearts and minds,” he said.

“The university is a leading organisation in the drive to promote STEM subjects – science, technology, engineering and maths.

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“I am a trustee of The National Autistic Society and my passion is inclusive education. I have seen first hand what technology can do to make education accessible for all.”

UCS has more than 400 students on STEM courses and there are plans to increase this as it expands its facilities.

More than £800,000 will be spent in developing its laboratory and specialist teaching facilities – with part of the funding coming from a £350,000 government grant.

UCS will be inviting children from local schools to visit the new centre as well as providing social media training sessions for the community.