Victory in fight against the traffic

RESIDENTS in a Suffolk street many describe as being “like the Hovis ad” are celebrating today after winning a 30-year battle to cut its traffic flows.

RESIDENTS in a Suffolk street many describe as being “like the Hovis ad” are celebrating today after winning a 30-year battle to cut its traffic flows.

From the New Year, historic Angel Lane in Woodbridge will be made one-way as part of an experimental traffic scheme.

Householders have been frustrated for years because cars and lorries have been allowed both ways up and down the narrow road - with police frequently called out to sort out disputes and help free stuck vehicles.

Many have also witnessed collisions, road rage and structural damage.

Wendy Webster, of the Angel Lane Residents' Group, said householders were thrilled at the one-way traffic order.

“For decades, the lane, flanked by centuries old cottages, has been the scene of angry stand-offs between motorists unable to pass each other, damage to property and cars, noise, pollution and speeding,” she said.

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“The lane has often been likened to the Hovis Bread advert - it certainly wouldn't now as the poor chap on his cycle would definitely be flattened along with his bread!

“With the recent Chapel Street closure and diverted traffic up to 1,800 cars a day, including dumper trucks, vans, lorries, have been using this lane, which is too narrow for two vehicles to pass.

“It is also used by the locals as a short cut to Melton rather than using the by-pass.”

Following pressure from the group and Woodbridge Town Council, county highways chiefs have agreed from January vehicles will be allowed to go uphill only - towards Market Hill - for six months to see how it works.

Others who will benefit from the scheme include pedestrians walking in the road, elderly residents of Felbridge Court and Woodbridge School pupils.

Mrs Webster said: “What we would like to discourage is cars using Chapel Street as this is also unsuitable for two-way traffic - originally the council were asked to make both lanes one way thus creating a 'roundabout' system.

“Drivers will have to use alternative routes such as the by-pass, after all that it what by-passes are built for, to divert traffic away from already congested towns.”

DID YOU KNOW?

The sepia Hovis ad with its cloth caps, brass band, cobbled street and picturesque cottages and northern atmosphere was actually filmed in the south of England - on Gold Hill in Shaftesbury in Dorset.

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