Villagers determined to beat developers

VILLAGERS in Trimley are still as determined as ever to fight any proposals for large-scale housing development, according to a new survey out today.In the past two-and-a-half years since Trinity College made its vision for the twin communities public, residents have been battling on all fronts to stop fields being taken for estates.

VILLAGERS in Trimley are still as determined as ever to fight any proposals for large-scale housing development, according to a new survey out today.

In the past two-and-a-half years since Trinity College made its vision for the twin communities public, residents have been battling on all fronts to stop fields being taken for estates.

There has been frustration at how long decisions over future housing are taking - but it is clear from the latest research householders have not changed their stance and the answer is still a firm no.

Questionnaires were sent to every household in Trimley St Mary and 91 per cent of those who returned them said no building should take place on green field sites.

They told parish councillors - who are opposed to major development - they want the rural setting of the village kept and 96pc want the twin Trimleys separate from each other and Felixstowe to give the communities their own identity.

Landowners Trinity College hope to build around 1,500 homes, plus a school and supermarket, and have identified potential sites.

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Suffolk Coastal planners say it is inevitable new homes will be built on greenfield sites as 10,100 will be needed in the next 16 years - and inevitable the Trimleys will be an option.

Trimley St Mary Parish Council chairman Richard Kerry said the aim of the survey was to see if the council was representing accurately the views of residents and which issues were causing most concern. It was expected development would be a major worry.

“The parish council are pleased with the response from residents and would like to thank them for all their comments. We will be considering these comments and deciding on the next steps in the near future,” he said.

He was disappointed many people who put comments did not give names.

“They should at least have had the courage to put their names and stand up for their convictions. It would have been nice to have gone and seen them and talked to them because they obviously feel strongly about some issues,” he said.

Some 18pc of households returned the questionnaire. Three-quarters felt there was a need for a small amount of affordable housing, 64pc were for sheltered housing and 62 pc for development of Great Street Farm in High Road.

Less than half were concerned about road noise from the A14, but 88pc were concerned at school run congestion.

WEBLINKS: www.savetrimely.co.uk

www.trimley-vision.co.uk

www.trimley-st-mary.org.uk

n Where should new homes be built in the Felixstowe area? Write to Your Letters, Evening Star, 30 Lower Brook Street, Ipswich, IP4 1AN, or e-mail EveningStarLetters@eveningstar.co.uk

factfile:

The story so far . . .

n July 2003: Trinity College, Cambridge, unveils its “vision” for the development of the Trimleys over the next 15 to 20 years - every field between the A14 and railway used for homes, school, village greens and employment.

n August/September 2003: Amid fears that 3,000 homes could be built and growing opposition, series of open days held to explain proposals. STAG - Save Trimley Against Growth - is formed.

n October 2003: Packed public meeting hears Suffolk Coastal MP John Gummer condemn the plans as against national policy - and call for small growth to meet the needs of the villages and wishes of its people.

n December 2003: Trinity College announces it is revising its proposals to take into account views expressed by the public.

n December 2004: Trinity College unveils its second vision - removing all the fields between Thurmans and Church Lane both side of the High Road to keep the villages separate, cutting the number of homes to 1,500.

n December 2004: STAG holds major protest at village sign, saying it will fight the revised proposals as they will cause just as much damage to the villages.

n 2005: Suffolk Coastal council expected to produce an options report on all possible sites for future housing in the district, but it is understood this is now delayed.

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