Look at these beautiful photos of Sealand in a Suffolk seaside sunrise

Terry Swan captured a series of gorgeous sunrise photographs of the sea off Felixstowe

Terry Swan captured a series of gorgeous sunrise photographs of the sea off Felixstowe - Credit: Terry Swan

The region has seen a number of breathtaking morning sunrises this week and the sight on Thursday in Felixstowe was no different. 

Terry Swan shared these photos he captured on his mobile showing Felixstowe Pier and the principality of Sealand caught in the gorgeous Suffolk sunrise. 

He said: "I just wanted to share a lucky shot from this morning, captured on my mobile. With the pier to my left, I watched the sun rise and pass right behind The Principality of Sealand.

"It was a breathtaking sunrise anyway, but the picture was the icing on the cake."

The Principality of Sealand/HM Fort Roughs silhouetted in front of the sunrise

The Principality of Sealand/HM Fort Roughs silhouetted in front of the sunrise - Credit: Terry Swan

The Rough Towers or the Principality of Sealand was one of seven similar fortresses built off the south coast of East Anglia during the Second World War.

Known as HM Fort Roughs, it was put into position in 1942 to serve as an anti-aircraft battery. 

It remained in use for this purpose until 1952, when more than 100 Royal Navy personnel were reassigned and it was abandoned entirely by 1956. 

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In 1965 the offshore platform was occupied by Jack and Jane Moore, on behalf of pirate station Wonderful Radio London.

In 1967 it was taken over by the infamous Paddy Roy Bates, soon to be known as Prince Roy of Sealand, who continued running a pirate station off the fort. 

In the same year, it was declared the Principality of Sealand. 

Felixstowe Pier looking majestic in the early morning sunlight

Felixstowe Pier looking majestic in the early morning sunlight - Credit: Terry Swan

Felixstowe Pier opened more than 100 years ago, in 1905, and was initially complete with its own railway station.

Once one of the longest in the country at 800m long, steamer services sailed from the pier to destinations including London and Great Yarmouth for the price of a penny. 

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