Whitehouse and Whitton ‘invisible barrier’ broken down by Ipswich school art project creating wall hangings

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary schools in Ipswich. Picture: GREGG BROWN - Credit: Gregg Brown

A community school art project has helped break down the “invisible barrier” between the Whitehouse and Whitton wards in Ipswich, a former mayor has claimed.

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary schools in Ipswich. Picture: GREGG BROWN - Credit: Gregg Brown

Year 5 pupils and staff at Whitehouse and Whitton primary schools worked together in a six-week arts project to learn printmaking skills and create large wall hangings.

Each child created a small lino cut depicting an aspect of their school or community. These were placed side by side to create the wall hangings.

Parents and grandparents gathered at the playground at Whitehouse Primary School to watch a two-tonne road roller create the wall hangings.

Whitehouse councillor and former mayor Glen Chisholm said: “This was a brilliant project which instilled a sense of community to the pupils, and what community means to them.

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary schools in Ipswich. Picture: GREGG BROWN - Credit: Gregg Brown


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“There is this invisible barrier between Whitehouse and Whitton, so is good to chip away at that. It is an historic thing which has always been there. It is good that the schools are now working on it, and I would like to see more north-west schools get involved.”

The project was funded by the North West Ipswich Big Local Trust, Oyster Community Press CIC and councillor James Crossley.

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Kenzie Rudland, nine, a pupil at Whitehouse primary, said: “I made a design of a bus as my dad is a bus driver. I showed it to him and he was really happy – and put it on the fridge.”

Nine-year-old Whitton primary pupil Bailey Garland said: “I loved the project because we were allowed to get really arty and it was fun to learn new skills.”

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary

A two-tonne steam roller created giant wall hangings to help connect Whitehouse and Whitton primary schools in Ipswich. Picture: GREGG BROWN - Credit: Gregg Brown

The 20 children who took part will receive certificates at a special assembly in April.

Year 5 teacher Rhonda Verrall said: “The children have loved it and have talked about it with enthusiasm in class.

“The project has linked in with their future aspirations. Some are already talking about studying art at high school and beyond. It’s given them that confidence to think about their future.

“The lino prints are very impressive and we will decide where they will be permanently placed soon.”

Lolly Hill, of the North West Ipswich Local Trust, added: “The pupils liked spending time in researching ideas for the wall hangings and produced some great work.”

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