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Young minds try to understand

PUBLISHED: 14:40 13 September 2001 | UPDATED: 10:31 03 March 2010

TEACHERS across Suffolk have been trying to explain to young minds the inexplicable, in the aftermath of Tuesday's terrorist attacks.

Children from service families at schools in the county are also becoming particularly concerned as minds begin to turn to the military consequences of any possible reprisals.

TEACHERS across Suffolk have been trying to explain to young minds the inexplicable, in the aftermath of Tuesday's terrorist attacks.

Children from service families at schools in the county are also becoming particularly concerned as minds begin to turn to the military consequences of any possible reprisals.

At Finborough School, a fee-paying independent school in Great Finborough, near Stowmarket, where a number of pupils have parents in the armed forces - including a number based at Wattisham Airfield – staff have been dealing with worries from some of the children.

"At the moment we have said to the pupils that there is no reason to be worried or to believe that their families would be involved at present," said headteacher Gwen Caddock, whose school caters for 200 children from the ages of two-and-a-half to 18.

"We do as much as we can to reassure them. We really keep everything as normal. We have talked to a one or two children who have expressed their concerns," she said.

"We have a long experience dealing with those issues. I have been through the Falklands War and Gulf War with children from service families, and a number of the staff have done the same.

"But there has been nothing indicative of alarm or panic – the regular routine is carrying on."

Elsewhere in Suffolk, schools have been fielding similar worries from children trying to fathom the horrific images coming from across the Atlantic.

Ian Brown, senior education officer for Suffolk County Council, said: "We are confident that schools will be able to deal with any issues that children may raise with their teachers regarding what happened yesterday.

"But as with any serious incident the LEA are able to assist the schools if children are upset by yesterday's events."

At Trimley St Mary Primary School Year Two pupils were led in a moment of quiet reflection and prayer in memory of those who died in the terrorist attack.

Head teacher Mike Jude said of yesterday's event: "Words were said and prayers were said and the children had a moment of quiet reflection, which I think they needed. They had seen all the scenes on the television the night before and welcomed a chance to reflect on it."

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